Edinburgh College of Art Textile Design Graduates Part One

The Textile Design department at Edinburgh College of Art is always full of hardworking students amongst a vivid display of patterns, drawings, colour, fabric samples and an array of colour. Inspiration behind this years graduates work ranges from growing up in the 90s to a tiny Eastern European village called Koniakow famous for its crochet. As well as exhibiting at Edinburgh College of Art’s degree show the inspiring graduates have also just returned from exhibiting at New Designers in London showcasing their designs to various designers and those in the industry.

Katrina Bell‘s collection (main image) ‘a nod to nostalgia’ is a bright and quirky interior collection aimed at new parents who want to recall their childhood in the 1970s/80s. Stamps, shapes and colour is really important to her collection which involved traditional screen printing, heat press techniques and embroidery on woolen blankets, drawer liners, cushions and fabric samples. Alongside her youthful approach to design, Katrina has an array of skills and with plenty of experience during work placements in industry (and a few in the pipeline!) the future is very bright (and colourful). See for yourself on her  website

Kirsty McCann‘s collection (left image) is a definite must see for anyone who grew up in the 90s. ‘Acceptable in the 90s’ celebrates the 90s cliches, inflatable bubble bags, trolls and incredibly recreates the ‘scratch and sniff’craze through screenprinted scents on to fabrics. Bold, bright and unexpected Kirsty’s collection shows her skills in embroidery, screen printing, digital printing and hand embellishment. Relive your childhood on her website

Graduate designer Olivia May O’Connor’s collection is inspired by the act of collecting, birds, bones and historic, iconic textiles. Her atmospheric colour palette and great use of scale is really shown off in the eye catching curtains while her fabric samples combine leather, interior fabrics with digital printing, laser etching and traditional techniques. Olivia has amazing hand drawing skills (right image) and designs for both the Fashion and Interior market. She is a very versatile designer and won the Duchamp Luxury Menswear Digital Print competition while at university. Delve more into her collection on her website

 

 

Graduate Textile Designers and their unique projects

Camilla Wordie and Emily Martin are two Textile Design graduates from Edinburgh College of Art with distinctive degree projects showing an interesting take on Textiles. Both graduates spent their final year producing personal projects which show an innovative approach to the norm of textile design.

Camilla Wordie‘s degree project blurs the boundary between food and textiles. She started with ‘Edible Textiles’ in which she transformed food into wearable surfaces by changing the form of the food and its common structure. Every week when I was in the studio Camilla would have a desk full of food – pasta, chocolate, noodles, oats- and would be experimenting with transforming its texture, composition or form into a surface unrecognisable from its ordinary state.

Her degree work took an unusual approach: ‘wearing rice is nice’ is a collection of rice inspired fabrics made from manipulating various types of rice to add textures to your dining experience, all with a subtleness to the design and white colour palette; ‘please add me to your dish’ (main image) encourages diners to add an ingredient to their dish making a physical interaction with the ingredients and your food including a herb flooring. The ingredients are manipulated food products cleverly done with a variety of textile processes playing with textures, scale and composition.

Camilla’s exhibition at Edinburgh College of Art’s degree show definitely drew attention for its individual concept, perfect branding and immaculate presentation. Have a look for yourself at Camilla’s website

Emily Martin‘s ‘Collective Recollections’ degree project aims to help those with dementia. Her collection of wall hangings for Edinburgh’s care homes are a talking point for the residents and visitors with scenes of Edinburgh referencing the 1950s encouraging viewers to reminisce the city and their past – they are great conversation starters! She worked with the ‘Oasis dementia cafe’ in Edinburgh, which supports those with dementia, to share her ideas, get some feedback and get creative! With Portobello Beach, Blackford Pond and Princes St Gardens as her chosen scenes Emily combined a wealth of textile processes – digital print, traditional screenprinting, hand embroidery – to produce large detailed wall hangings that are both visually and texturally stimulating – a key feature for those with dementia. Emily has used the wall hangings as starting points for craft and art activities with the ‘Oasis dementia cafe’ group. See her wall hangings in full detail on her website .

Both Camilla and Emily have had successful textile careers so far with various award nominations and wins! The future is definitely bright and innovative…

Geraldine Peclard

Geraldine Peclard is a Swiss artist and textile designer currently living in London.

Having just recently graduating from Chelsea College of Art and Design with a BA in Textile Design, Geraldine was always drawn to vibrant prints and a creative, freely-working workflow. After beginning her degree, Geraldine became inspired by statement artists who challenged prejudices; that used social issues and taboos to create their work. She then ventured into new, intrinsic ways of expressing her passion for vibrancy, pattern and design through other mediums – Painting and illustration, for example.

Geraldine’s recent work concentrates more so on the subject of mental illness, which she claims allows her to work freely and gives her unlimited interpretations of how the structure of her work can be. Despite her gruling subjects, Geraldine finds ways of taking all of that emotion and creating beautiful imagery with them.

To view more of Geraldine’s work, visit her website, here –   http://geraldinestories.blogspot.co.uk/

 

– Killian

Introducing..Ximena Escobar.

Ximena Escobar is a left-handed illustrator and wallpaper-pattern designer based out of London. She has acquired two MA Degrees, one in Illustration from Camberwell College of Art and Design in 2012, and one in Design for Textile Futures from Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in 2005.

Ximena’s work is derived from her inspirations that deal with the relationships between women and nature, as well as the notion of ‘the Shaman woman’ – or someone who is able to reach a altered states of consciousness, allowing them to encounter and interact with the spirit world. Her ‘Blooming’ series, which are made from homemade illustrations and fabric collage, involve portraits of individual women and flowers or animals. The artist’s use of collage aids in creating a three-dimensional, layered object, helping to bring her portraits to life. Her use of colour is extraordinary, complimenting each other and catching the viewer’s eye.

To find out more about Ximena’s work, as well as keep up to date on any future showcasings of the artists’ work, visit her Website here, or follow her on Twitter, here.

– Killian

(All imagery courtesy of Ximena Escobar)

Death By Tea

Death By Tea (aka Holly Betton) is on a mission to make your homeware more artistic. Her range of printed textiles, ceramics and cards are sweet and playful, bringing a touch of childhood innocence into our busy, grown-up lives.

Having graduated from Nottingham Trent University in 2010 with a degree in Textile Design, Holly decided to pursue her interest in drawing and printmaking. All her designs start off with a simple monoprint, creating the “naïve mark and line” that gives her work its characteristic appearance. Colour is then added along with the endearing messages that add another dimension to the cute and funny quality of her pieces.

To browse some more of Death By Tea’s lovely designs, visit her website or her Not On The High Street profile.

– Georgie