Don’t Feed The Bears

Last season, prints of animals were huge on the catwalks, most prolifically with Givenchy’s Bambi T-shirt that has been one of the most coveted items of the year so far. If you can’t afford the Givenchy price tag (I know I certainly can’t) then there are cheaper but nonetheless brilliantly kitsch alternatives that are in-keeping with this trend, my personal favourite being Don’t Feed The Bears, a company based in Sheffield and established in 2010.

Don’t Feed The Bears make unique hand-printed and finished T-shirts and sweaters depicting hand-drawn pictures of bears, squirrels and wolves doing all sorts of eccentric things like wearing monocles, riding bikes and sporting TV sets on their heads. The designs are refreshingly witty and imaginative, going against the high street imperative of mass produced uniformity clothing.

In addition to the brilliant array of T-Shirts and sweaters available from their website http://dontfeedthebears.co.uk, Don’t Feed The Bears also have a T-Shirt Club where they send you a T-Shirt every month from 3 months to a whole year, the perfect way to keep your wardrobe fresh and exciting. Each brand new item comes with a design you can pick yourself from the collection, or can leave to the team to decide for you. A novelty that won’t wear off anytime soon I’m sure…

Closely related is their ‘Pick a Pocket’ option, where you can literally do just that, select a pocket material from a number of different prints, ranging from flamingos and horses to checks and tartan. Customisation at no extra cost is something that most high street shops do not offer, therefore Don’t Feed The Bears are really onto something with their attention to their customer’s individual likes and interests.

And in these cold, wintry times, those sweaters are looking temptingly warm and cosy…

Find Don’t Feed The Bears on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dontfeedthebearstshirts

Follow Don’t Feed The Bears on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dntfeedthebears

The Half Earth

You could say it’s a cliché to sing about love, loss and relationships – that timeless, often derivative subject matter. The Half Earth gives the topic a whole new, irresistable bitterness.

Sheffied-based Conor Stephenson makes organic folk music, as his Gaia-like artist name might suggest. A recent Chemistry graduate, The Half Earth has swapped chemical equations for guitar chords and the lab for his recording studio bedroom. Listening to his music, it’s a good job he did.

Through his ethereal instrumental and torn lyrics, The Half Earth brings a stripped-back, bleeding dimension to folk music, drawing from Bon Iver and creating something novel altogether.

“Jimi Hendrix made me want to play guitar,” Conor told altblackpool. Growing up on a diet of Nirvana, Bjork, PJ Harvey and Radiohead, The Half Earth was born and bred in a musical household and owned a guitar from the age of eight. He plays his instrument with such raw tenderness, his melancholic vocals seeping between the strings, it is hard not to be touched by the emotive tones and pastel shades his tracks paint.

The Half Earth’s triumphs include ‘Fox’ and ‘Counting’ which, in addition to ‘Pale Water’ and ‘End’, make what is already an impressive repetoire for an artist in such early days.

Find The Half Earth on Facebook.

 

 

Tom J Newell

Having lived in Camden Town my whole life, moving to Sheffield to study was a strange experience. It can be hard balancing a life in two cities, one wishes that there were something you could bring with you to both places. Imagine my delight when I discovered the striking similarity between the dark yet fascinating cartoons I was used to seeing on the side of the Unicorn Pub down the road from me in Camden and the equally beautiful and twisted work on the walls and in the burger menus within The Harley, Sheffield.

The man responsible for these home comforts (and the beautiful artwork) is artist and illustrator Tom J Newell. Raised in Chesterfield, Tom J Newell has worked on all kinds of projects. Aside his fabulous wall murals he also produces paintings, comics, posters and all things in between. Born and raised in Chesterfield, he has now moved to Sheffield a five year stint in London, working closer to home in a city that is bursting with creativity.

Tom’s inspiration seems to spring from all over the place, which perhaps is what makes his work so unique. Taking influences from the Beano and Dandy as a child, he began drawing comic book characters, and was further influenced by video games and graffiti as he grew older.

Moonlighting as a DJ, its not just the visual that keeps his creative juices flowing. He also takes a lot of inspiration from music and literature. “Music and musicians inspire my artwork just as much as visual sources” he says, “I approach the construction of a new image by manipulating existing imagery”.

It’s not hard to see that Tom is a forced to be reckoned with, his illustrations alone have had something of a viral effect already. His artwork is splattered across the menus of the Twisted Burger Company, Kraken Rum and all over the walls of bars, tattoo studios and galleries.

What’s more, despite significant grounds for arrogance, Tom J Newell strikes me first and foremost as a a wholeheartedly Decent Guy. Won’t take my word for it? Ask Sheffield Children’s Hospital, where he ran workshops in 2010 “That was another great excuse to get out of the studio,” he told me “and seeing the approach that kids have towards drawing is always inspiring.”

Still working in his studio developing old doodles that he did in school and having his work put up all over sheffield and beyond, Mr. Newell is a fireball of compassion, talent and ultimately an unrestrained creativity. His imaginative, sometimes slightly unhinging illustrations are impossible to forget.

Curious? Visit TomJNewell.com.

The Harley Venue, Sheffield

Described as a “fun loving, hip-shaking home of legendary live music and innovative club nights”, The Harley venue in Sheffield is guaranteed to give you a night you won’t forget (or remember, as the case may be!).  Having celebrated its 10th birthday in October 2013, The Harley is something of an institution in the city, with lots of amazing musical acts having played there, from The xx and the Arctic Monkeys, to AlunaGeorge and The Vaccines.

As well as continuing to promote weekly shows at The Harley, its live music producers Harley Live  have gone on to create and run the nationally-acclaimed music festival Tramlines, whose alumni include WeAreScientists, Alt-J and hundreds more.  Hosting takeovers at various Sheffield venues, including working men’s club Queen Social Club and the Gothic Cathedral; each venue creates a new, surprising atmosphere, ensuring a memorable night!

Whilst live music is The Harley’s lifeblood, it also plays host to an eclectic mix of club nights, drawing in hundreds of students.  Dubcentral, Thirsty Ear and Club Pony are amongst some of the nights; with the music played ranging from dubstep to reggae and techno, guaranteeing everyone’s music tastes will be satisfied.

During the day, The Harley is home to the award-winning Twisted Burger Company – arguably the best burgers in Sheffield! – with an ever-changing menu that keeps fans coming back for more and more.  And as if that wasn’t enough, if you find you literally can’t keep yourself away from The Harley, they offer a 22-room hotel above the bar for you to crash after an amazing night.

If you love live music and happen to be in Sheffield on Saturday 1 February, then I suggest you get yourself down to The Harley, where up-and-coming band Algiers will be performing, promoting their new album You’re The Captain.  Trust me; it’s going to be great!

For more information, and to check out up-and-coming acts, head over to The Harley’s Facebook page.

 

Algiers

Based in the musical Mecca that is Sheffield, upcoming duo Algiers is taking on British contemporary rock culture with its playfully coloured style of pop rock. Picture a festival stage beneath the blazing sunshine or a packed red-bricked Camden venue. This band is the sound of Britain through and through.

Whilst hard rock can be too abrasive for some, and indie or pop too lacklustre for others, Algiers strike an appealing balance between the two. Weightless yet driving, William’s light, almost folkey vocal and guitar melodies surf over John’s cogent drumlines. Borrowing the simple pop music formula in their composition, the boys achieve personality through their heartfelt lyrics and catchy hooks. Most impressively, their sound has the energy of a band twice the size of a duo.

In fact, William and John actually met in a bar and bonded over appreciation for the other’s band at the time. A jam turned into several and in October 2011 they broke onto scene with their EP ‘Four Priests’. Two years later, Algiers have unveiled a more rustic track ‘Lighthouse’, which will be followed by their debut album ‘You’re The Captail’ on 27 January 2014 on Xtra Mile Recordings – also home to releases by the likes of Frank Turner.

‘As Tall As A Lighthouse’ is a tangy folk rock anthem with its organic vocals, aboriginal drumming, quick skipping guitar riff and kaleidoscopic reverb – topped off with a very original vintage music video. More psychedelic than ‘Four Priests’, the track echoes the likes of MGMT and Yeasayer and shows the duo to have truly fine-tuned their sound in the past couple of years. Catch them gigging up and down the UK and launching the album in the New Year.

Find Algiers on Facebook, Bandcamp and Twitter.

Jordan Reed

It’s lucky, in a way, that I have to be constantly on the lookout for new and exciting musicians and artists when I’m writing this blog. What’s even luckier that I have a whole plethora of talented friends, right under my nose. Here’s another Sheffield-based master of indie acoustic rock: Jordan Reed. Hailing from Ruislip in London, his silky voice and talented guitar playing have been getting him noticed in musical circles here – turns out it’s not so grim up North, after all. Let’s get to know him a little better…

What did you want to do when you were a kid?

I wanted to be an astronaut. I’ve always been fascinated by science and space and I thought there was nothing cooler than being someone who goes out there and experiences it first hand. One year, I got given a telescope kit because I wanted to learn more about the stars, but it wasn’t very good, so I ended up learning more about my neighbours than the night sky…

What do you do in your spare time?

I’m always watching movies; I find I can draw a lot of influence from these. You can get a lot of advice and wisdom from films – ‘Rooftops’ by Lost Prophets was inspired by a Zach Braff movie, didyaknow?

 What or who are your influences?

The people around me. I try to include my relationships with my friends and family into what’s going on with my music – they’re such a huge part of my life, and it’s a good way of documenting my feelings at that time. Like a musical diary. I like Green Day and Jack Savoretti and Johnny Cash a lot, though.

 How would you describe your ‘sound’?

I’m still trying to discover my own sound right now. A “not-as-good-but-hopefully-one-day-I’ll-be-like John Butler Trio”.

What was the first album you ever bought? (No judgement; mine was Britney Spears. Shameful.)

My Chemical Romance ‘I Brought You My Bullets, You Brought Me Your Love’. What. An. Emo.

Yeah, wow… let’s move away from any sharp objects. What would be your perfect gig line-up?

The Beatles, that would have been awesome. And Queen. Nirvana. (I’m going for the ones we know we can’t see, in this purely hypothetical situation).

What’s your proudest achievement?

Scoring the winning goal at a national football tournament when I was 11 or 12. Sad that I’ve not done anything that noteworthy since.

What are your plans for the future?

I’ve got a few gigs in the pipeline but nothing’s set in stone yet. I might work on a side project or two, but for now I’m just developing my sound and focussing on improving my craft.

Artist: Tom Holmes

Aged just 17 years old, Tom Holmes is the latest artistic wünderkind to burst from the Sheffield scene. With Facebook buzzing about his promotional work for Tramlines festival, what else does he have up his sleeve? I find out:

What did you want to do when you were a kid?

A writer, originally my characters were made of words rather than pen marks. I started drawing the characters I wrote about, then the drawings came first and the stories followed. If I ever became a writer I think I would have to illustrate my book too, even though I never wrote kid’s stories.

Why did you want to go into art?

Getting into art ‘properly’ happened as a bit of an accident, I always drew and I had a style developing, but when I started drawing the bobbleheads I suddenly got suggestions that people might like to buy them. I gave it a shot and got into a really good gallery in Sheffield alongside some of the best artists in the city, which was an amazing start for me. It got me thinking that People might actually respond to what I do, and when the artwork I had in there sold it was confirmed.

Where do you get your inspiration from?

I try not to copy other artists outright but a lot of the time my inspiration does come from other people’s work, which I think is fine so long as you’re not ripping anyone else off. When I work I tend to have videos of interviews with really big, successful artists playing in the background, and that motivates me to try and get onto their level. In the same way that a young musician might go to a gig, see the band on stage and think ‘I want to be up there’, I’ll go to a gallery and do the same with the artwork. I’ll go home and start coming up with some crazy ideas for a show I want to put on.

What do you do in your spare time?

I would say draw, but recently all the drawing I do has been much more purposeful, it’s always for a design job or an exhibition rather than just doodles filling up space. I’m pretty lucky that the ‘work’ I do basically constitutes a hobby, I’ve not really had to change the way I draw just because I’m doing it for someone else rather than for my own entertainment. People like what I do already, which is great because it means I can stay consistent.

Who’s your favourite artist?

Asking for a single favourite artist is a really difficult one, I like anyone who can apply themselves to a lot of different disciplines but still stay consistent and recognisable in their work. I like most of what comes out of Sheffield, but especially Geo Law and Mute, they’re two artists who I looked up to massively who also turned out to be really nice people. On a wider scale I’m a fan of Buff Monster and the Beast Brothers, their work is so clean and bold, something I really appreciate in art.

You take a lot of influences from music – who’s your favourite band/artist?

For the past year or so Enter Shikari have dominated my iPod. I got into Slipknot when I was about ten so I’ve never been a stranger to heavy music, I just love the energy and noise of a live show. If I want something calmer Gorillaz are usually a good choice, their music always reminds me of going to London (my favourite place outside of Sheffield) because I picked up a couple of their albums when I was there a few years ago. I’m pretty involved with the local music scene in Sheffield too, I’ve designed posters and CD covers for a few of the bands and there really is a huge amount of talent here that should be recognised and promoted.

What would you say is your biggest achievement?

I was recently part of a group exhibition in the middle of Sheffield, it was only up for about two weeks but my work was hanging with some of my artistic heroes, and I got a lot of exposure and sales from it. I hadn’t known that kind of recognition before, and since then I’ve been approached to do more and more work, which keeps me busy and motivated. The whole thing felt like a big achievement and a sort of step up from what I had been doing before.

What are your plans for the future?

I’d love to put on a solo show and see how that goes. I’m working on another group show but to have a whole exhibition to play around with and show off new and old work would be fantastic.

Steph Carr

Steph Carr is a contemporary fine artist, who has just finished her degree at Sheffield Hallam University. Her work is both wonderfully conceptual and thought provoking, whilst still being beautifully executed. Her latest work is intricate and visually stunning, adding depth to the ideas behind each piece. In a time where contemporary artists are common, it’s rare to fine one with so much thought behind each piece, whilst still maintaining quality and visual effect. This is something that makes Steph special, and I urge you to see more of her. Here’s what she had to say:

Tell me about yourself as an artist

I’ve just graduated from BA Hons Contemporary Fine Art at Sheffield Hallam University. I work with everyday domestic materials, commonly found and used in the home currently to create objects that change themselves from waste material to objects of desire that you want to return to the home. I have a fascination for that transformation stage, the moment something changes from rubbish to some form of spectacle, offering a new way of looking. Being hands on is really important for me, in everything I do I aim for the materials to remain honest and for there to be signs of the objects being handmade. Taking inspiration from the in between moments in our everyday lives, materials show themselves be it a pile of used teabags or discarded material the textures and colours found in these objects is what I take away to make something new. My work has a deep routed focus on perception of beauty and I aim to create things that we actively want in our homes and lives.

What are the influences and inspirations behind your latest works?

My latest work seen in my degree show ‘The Discarded Made Tangible (Sweepings)’ was a creation of wallpaper. We drink hundreds of cups of tea within the home each month and the overriding waste was impossible to ignore. I began collecting the used teabags and in the drying out process placed them onto paper, the pattern and colour left on the paper by the bag was so beautiful I took this and created a wallpaper design. After a battle trying to reproduce the pattern by hand on the paper it became clear a digital aid was needed so I used a combination of Photoshop help to create the design and hands on approach by screen-printing the design by hand on to lining paper. For the purpose of the degree show it was important for me to offer clues to the viewer as to what materials had been used, so I matched the pigments as closely as possible to a tea staining. There are many references that flood into this work; the main points are the amount we use and waste in our homes and also the possibilities of those waste materials. I feel that the use of tea offers many links dependant on the viewer; some have referenced the similarities to Victorian wallpapers and the importance of the tea trade in that period, some have noticed similarities to the Rorschach inkblot test that uses pareidolia (seeing things in abstract inkblot images) in an attempt to gain insight into a person’s mental state. For me, I want the viewer to feel they want to remove the piece from the gallery space and return it to the home, where the material was collected and used.

As a young artist, have you found it difficult to establish your own style?

I think for any artist the pressure to find ‘a style’ is always the black sheep in the room. For me, going through the motions of university has been the best way to find out what I am interested in and how I want to progress with my work. It seems to have come from nowhere really, but when you think about the amount of information you soak up being surrounded by other artists in the form of tutors, outside professionals and peers it all contributes to your way of working and thinking. In my final year something seemed to change, a focusing of ideas (maybe the pressure of the degree show contributed!) and putting a piece of work in to the gallery space as your final university piece spurs you on to push yourself. There are some amazing opportunities for creative in this country and I find inspiration in all media’s and areas, the main thing I would say to any young artist is to just keep going! Wherever you go and whatever you see you take something with you and all of these aspects come together to form your ‘style’. I am still learning and growing as I think every artist does and with every piece I make there is more that I would like to do to it and new ideas that arise from putting a realised work in to a space.

What are your thoughts on the British Art scene of today?

Some of my greatest inspirations have been from British artists; I find the work of artists like Deborah Bowness (www.deborahbowness.com) so beautiful and they push me in my own mind and practice to keep going with an idea and to keep perfecting it. Bowness takes everyday objects such as lamps or chairs and uses photographs of them to create wallpaper, this can completely transform a space and offers solutions for those with little space in the home. She has also got a very interesting project on the go ‘The Paper Trail’ that takes disused spaces on our streets and papers them, drawing attention not only to her work but to the tragedy of our British high street where shops are closing down every day and spaces are being wasted. There are so many inspirational artists around and they keep emerging as more and more creative arise from schools, universities and colleges. Another huge inspiration for me is Timorous Beasties, their mainly hand-printed wallpapers and designs are so grand and beautiful, they are well known for their contemporary take on the traditional ‘Toile De Jouy’ pattern of Napoleonic France however they recreate scenes in a similar style of modern cities.

What can we expect to see from you in future?

I’m not too sure what the future holds! I am interested in many mediums including illustration photography and craft so I hope to always be involved in something creative. In an ideal world I would love to continue working on designs for wallpapers, fabrics and other aspects of the home however I am not sure how this would be possible currently! I will always be a creative person and in one way or another I know this passion will filter through to all aspects of my life. If nothing else, I just hope to offer some form of inspiration to those who see my work. In a society where we have no focus on what we use or waste, as it is so readily available to us, I hope to elevate the potential of what is in front of us to a position of significance.

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To find out more about this young artist and her work, contact her via her email:  carr_stephanie91@live.co.uk

 

Ellie Ragdale

Ellie Ragdale is a stop motion animator based in Sheffield. As well as creating her beautiful and intricate films, Ellie is also on a mission to bring the creation of animated film to the masses, running workshops for children and planning film screenings designed to bring the Sheffield creative community together. Find out all about her and her work below.

Ellie has been making animations since her final year studying Drama and Screen at the University of Manchester, when she managed to persuade her tutor to let her take a new second year module in animation. She had always been interested in animated film, having loved shows like Pingu and Camberwick as a child, but says it was the inspirational teaching of Barry Purves, the module leader and acclaimed stop motion animator, that made her realise just how passionate she was about it. Ellie threw herself into the course with enthusiasm, making her first film, Tim the Tiny Horse, a project focussing on adapting fantasy texts for screen and based on the stories of comedian Harry Hill.

Ellie says that the reason stop motion animation appealed to her so greatly is because it allows her to combine her two loves, namely making things and making films. Her films encompass a variety of styles and techniques (such as puppet animation, pixilation and papercraft) and she cites her influences as not only children’s stop motion television programmes, but also the “non-polished, handmade aesthetic” of director Michel Gondry.

After graduation, Ellie found work experience with a variety of different filmmakers, companies and festivals, including working with Broken Pixel animator Ashley Dean on two music videos (Gazpacho’s Black Lily and Fossil Collective’s Let It Go, which won best music video at the 2012 Aesthetica Film Festival). She continued to create her own films and in the summer of 2012, through what she describes as ‘almost coincidence’, began to make films with musician and friend Andrew Anderson. The pair’s skills complimented each other perfectly, with Andrew’s original compositions providing the ideal score for Ellie’s animations. Their first film, You Let Me Down Again, was a music video for Andrew’s band Proto Idiot, and has since been shown at the London Short Film Festival. Since then, they have worked on several films together, including The Animal Arkhive, for which they received funding though IdeasTap and permission to use sound effects from the British Libraries sound archive.

Ellie’s says that her plans for the future are to continue working with Andrew under their company ‘Peck Films’. Their aim is to secure commissions to make animated shorts for companies, as well as to continue to make their own films. Recently, Ellie has also begun to teach animation as part of the Kids Art Academy afterschool club sessions around Sheffield. Through Sheffield-based community arts charity Art in the Park and somewhereto_ (a nation-wide Olympic legacy scheme that focuses on connecting young people aged 16-25 with free space to do the things they love) Ellie secured funding through O2’s ‘Think Big’ grant, meaning that she was able the run a series of animation workshops in more disadvantaged areas of the city and, as a continuation of this, last month had her application bid for O2’s ‘Think Bigger’ fund accepted. As a result, this Autumn she plans to stage an immersive cinema screening event for children. Ellie says that she wants it to be a community event, showcasing the work of local children created in a series of workshops leading up to the event, and involving other young creative people like herself “to combine a variety of skills and talents and make this event something really special and unique”

For more information about Ellie’s work, visit her Vimeo page or follow her on Twitter.

Early Cartographers

Early Cartographers are a multi-instrumental acoustic outfit currently purveying their own upbeat folk(ish)-pop melodies across Sheffield. Encompassing a diverse range of musical influences and styles, not to mention beautiful harmonies and a huge array of different instruments, Early Cartographers  are quite the musical-melting pot. With a seemingly ever-evolving line-up, it might be a fair to assess them as less of a band and more of a musical collective, a description which seems to fit a group who confess they prefer playing “in parks, allotments, on rooftops and the back rooms of small cafés”, although they are happy to play more conventional venues too. This collective ethos coupled with the sharing of the song-writing load, the vocals and, indeed, the instruments, means that this group come across as something rather wonderful, carving a unique niche for themselves in a time when it is becoming increasingly difficult for bands to stand out.

The music itself is quite glorious, moving effortlessly as it does between soft and ethereal to powerful and resounding, all the while laid over with perfectly balanced harmonies. Poetic lyrics are intertwined with a rich musical canvas of acoustic guitars, strings, percussion and brass, giving each track a multi-layered quality that builds and soars into something quite captivating.

If you’re after something unusual, simultaneously uplifting and haunting, poetic and with the ability to enchant, then you’ve come to the right place. For more tracks, news and live dates, head over to the Early Cartographers website or check out their Facebook page. Ooh, and don’t forget to download their EP ‘The Wolf Chorus’ via their bandcamp.

Renegade Brass Band

Do you like funk? Do you like jazz? Do you like hip-hop? If you answered yes to any of these questions, well get ready, because your mind is about to be well and truly blown.

Formed in Sheffield back in 2009, and comprising of eight horns, two percussionists, a scratch DJ and a live MC, the Renegade Brass Band are quite simply a tour-de-force of funk and soul. With a incredible live reputation preceding them, and a whole host of hi-profile festivals and support slots under their belts, it is safe to say that this twelve-piece are currently creating some sizeable waves in the industry. Named by the Sheffield’s premier dubstep and hip-hop night the Tuesday Club as one of their top live acts, and having recently played the Craig Charles Funk & Soul Show live in Manchester, it cannot be long before they explode completely.

Keep your eyes peeled for new material coming shortly, as well a whole host of live shows. For more information (and of course more tracks), check out the Renegade Brass Band website and Facebook page.

Jim Ghedi

Jim Ghedi is the equivalent of a ‘sleeper hit’ in the local Sheffield music scene. Owing to the spiritual bent and ethereal soundscapes which constitute his music, his discreet acoustic creations have been lost on those who haven’t had their ears to the ground.

Another possible reason for slow but steady rise maybe the eclectic styles the 22-year-old draws from. Some have traced his musical roots to ‘Folk, Blues, Free Jazz and Eastern World Music’ putting forward the sound suggestion that Jim Draws influences far removed from hilly suburbs of Sheffield.

Thanks to a series of well-promoted shows in and around the city, word has spread about experimental folk artist. His innovative composition rejects formal structure in favour of a rhythmically and tonally-orientated order of music.

This isn’t music you can ignore; it demands your attention and you risk losing it if the nuances and shades aren’t headed.

Jim’s right-hand man is Neal Heppleston whose instrument of choice is the double bass and his deft picking and emotive bowing lays down the low-end bass frequencies to the songs. So far Jim and Neal have delivered two astonishing releases: ‘Archipelago’ and the recent ‘Of Abyssinia’.

The reference to the old empire reflects the meditative voyage the music navigates through. Though the music is spiritual in its sonic composition the themes are earthy and natural. Recent interest indicates that this ‘sleeper hit’ is causing the steel city to finally stir.

On a side-note, does Jim look a bit like Nick Drake?

Listen to ‘Of Abysinia’ here

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