The King’s Parade

Sometimes all you need to find talent is to take a hike – or a walk in Camden Locke. Whilst wandering to the nearby station and grabbing some Pakistani-style chicken masala wrap (with cheese), I followed the catchy strains of guitar drifting past the bridge and came across The King’s Parade – to be precise, their four talented members, Olivier Corpe (vocals/guitar), Sam Rooney (piano/vocals), Tom English (bass and sax), and Chris ‘The King” Brent, wielding his drumsticks with savvy.

In this age of Internet-based advertising, it’s refreshing to find a band that so relentlessly and successfully pursues a musical career through direct interaction with their listeners: live street performances. Scrolling through the music video of their hit single “Vagabond” on Youtube, the enthusiastic comments are largely from fans exclaiming that they found the R&B band through performances in places ranging from Trafalgar Square, Camden, the British Museum and even Leeds.

Their music is catchy and melodic, upbeat notes and rich, deep voices tinged with melancholia. The Parade’s Motown influences lend soul to their professional compositions and contemporary lyrics, perhaps best seen in “Vagabond”, which has now over 18,000 plays on Soundcloud and has amassed them a slowly growing fanbase – one whose strength rests in the fact that that many of those fans have already had the privilege of listening to them live, and know they prove to be just as good in reality as through a computer screen or filtered through a pair of headphones.

The King’s Parade’s first album will be officially released this October, and their next gig is coming up on the 16th of October at Paper Dress in London. If you’re seeking a quietly enchanting something to go with that chilled drink in the dusk of evening or some bluesy tunes to keep you company in the silence of the night, have a listen to the band by perusing their website and Facebook, or following their sounds via Soundcloud and Youtube.

Beauty and Soul Brought to London: One to Watch: Kenzie May

Boston-born, yet Britain-bred, Kenzie May is one of London’s young talented musicians using her experiences in the city as both her backdrop and inspiration. With admirable amounts of experience under her belt, Kenzie’s beats are organic in that they flow freely,  consisting of tongue-in-cheek wordplay and fluid, honest lyrics.

With songs such as the raw, moving “Say Nothing” which is almost reminiscent of ballads of the early nineties, to the upcoming single “Hide & Seek”, her word play based on love, with the twist of childhood games, memories, and nursery rhymes are honest and right on point for the more literary, thinking crowd.

Moved by  art and creativity, the mesmerising Kenzie May is both beautiful and talented. Her writing style and composition are one of the most relevant pieces of work for someone so in touch with our generation. The rawness in her synthesized and digital sounds  break the mold from the forgettable radio releases we hear constantly.

Having collaborated with favourites and pros, such as Sub Focus in their tune “Falling Down” ad well as BeatauCue “Slow Down” and Bastille & F Stokes “Bad Blood”, Kenzie May is hard working and experimental with different techniques.

Writing in a flow which makes the surface of your skin chill, as well as your body to rock form side to side, is a rare talent which Kenzie May possesses, as each song is haunting in a way to lead to an afterthought and reflection – pop music for the thinking set, if you will.

 Kenzie’s single “Hide & Seek” produced by Jocke Åhlund of Teddybears, is set to have its video release by the end of the month, done by De La Muerte Films.

For some pop with honesty and edge, check out more on https://soundcloud.com/kenziemay or check out her most recent collaboration with FTSE, “Float” on Soundcloud.

http://soundcloud.com/ftse-1/float-ft-kenzie-may

 Images via: http://kenziemay.com

Follow Kenzie May on Tumblr and Twitter:

http://kenziemay.tumblr.com 

@kenziemayb

 

 

Yola Fatoush

Yola Fatoush’s self-titled EP, released through Parlour Records in June earlier this year, introduces the duo’s emphatic cascade of sound, which washes over the listener and sees them deserving the appellations of “immersive” and “transcendental” given to them by their label.

From the synthesised bells on the track  The Premises, mixed in with discordant and droning bass patterns, to the choral arrangements on Usher in Spring, it’s clear that the band draws in tonal pallets from a variety of influences.

Leading the EP, however, is the engaging track Celine which has yelps and staccato synth bleeps and chords jarring throughout the verses; these open up to a woozy chorus that melts all the punch in the former part of the song into an “immersive” and melodic haze.

The pitched down ‘R’n’B’ samples on tracks like Circle of Pain are indebted to ‘R’n’B influences; the group cite as Chicago’s DJ Nate and producer Jeremih as experimental artists they feel connected to.

Amidst the leftfield electronic influence there is perceptible pop sensibility that informs an ear for melody and song craft Grimes would be proud of.

The attraction of the band, having said all this, is the combination of influence and technique in what is a very listenable pop style. Look out for the band as they tour in the next couple of weeks, particularly at the Oxjam Festival at The Bowery in Sheffield.