Ayesha Tan-Jones

Ayesha Tan-Jones is a student at Central Saint Martins and an installation and video artist who makes music as Brownie Promise. I have only ever been a spectator online but to me, her work (and whole online presence) acts like an invitation into her distinct own brand of the psychedelic, it is a wonderland and functions like a treasure trove. Ayesha seems to drift effortlessly through mediums in her music, gently reflecting the tenor of her cystaline and pretty bodily installation. The video work feels like it threads everything together into a totally multi-sensory experience which becomes almost other worldly!

Of course the best person to collaborate with is another version of yourself!

Ayesha uses her alter-ego Una X Jynx like another voice through which to make work, we see them video chatting and interacting online where they plan to make collaborative hypnosis videos and collaborations like software upd8 // version 2.∞ // STEP 1. For me their work function feels like two girls coming together over the web to voyage through it as a mystical entity, as if together they can begin to understand it.

 

Ayesha can be found onilne via her visual journal and website and specific art blog and Una at her very own website here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Louise Orwin

Louise Orwin is a performance artist whose work deals with anxiety, humiliation, and expectations of femininity. She is currently based in London, after earning her MA in Performance in 2011, and her latest project, Pretty Ugly, is causing quite a stir.

Orwin found herself fascinated by a recent trend, young preteen and teenage girls creating videos for YouTube asking the mostly-anonymous commenters if they are pretty or ugly. Despite these videos almost always leading to a tidal wave of anonymous abuse, the trend rapidly gained popularity. Curious about why young girls would subject themselves to such harsh bullying and what it was like to experience the backlash of a “Pretty or Ugly?” video, Orwin decided to find out firsthand.

Using her performing chops, Orwin took on three teenaged personae for the project, called Becky, Baby, and Amanda, and made different videos for each one. Now, in a performance piece that will be running from 23 October to 9 November at the Camden People’s Theater, the videos she created will be combined with YouTube comments they received, and material from interviews Orwin conducted with the teen girls affected by this trend. Orwin hopes this project will not simply result in an entertaining performance, but also serve as a part of her continuing research into how social media is effecting our lives. Here is the blog she made specifically to document the progress of the Pretty Ugly project.

Orwin is also working on a series of photographs exploring women’s relationships with food and dieting, and her past projects include interactive performances and spaces that focus on creating a one to one connection between the artist and the viewer. If you would like to see more information on her work, check out her personal website.

GLTI.CH Karaoke

To mesh music, performance and collaborative participation is no easy task, yet it’s what artists/writers/wannabe hackers Kyougn Kmi and Daniel Rourke (who’s currently completing his PhD in art and writing practice at Goldsmiths) set out to do in GLTI.CH Karaoke. Most of us have half-baked childhood fantasies about becoming rock stars that we live out in our showers to an imaginary audience. The fundamental human desire to make lyrical noise and its power as an intimate social experience is, perhaps, best seen in the karaoke social phenomenon, which originated in Japan in the 1970s.

The word karaoke originates from the Japanese character kara or “empty” and ōkesutora for “orchestra”. Strangely poetic: empty orchestra. Karaoke’s pop-culture existence feeds on and is inseparable from technology: a dark, faux-luxurious room and microphones connected to the mother womb of the TV screen, which flashes music videos and proclaims lyrics across its face as we belt out songs (badly), sycophants of desire. Why do we do it? Maybe because singing is a cathartic experience, or because it gives us access to our deepest fantasies.

GLTI.CH Karaoke takes this one step further. Their website, Glti.ch (in itself a whimsical play on words), sets out an unofficial manifesto for their intentions:

“Since April 2011 we’ve been exposing the course of accidents, temporal lyrical disjoints and technical out-of syncs. GLTI.CH Karaoke breaches hopeless distances with cultural and technical make-dos of readily available technology, to kluge people together in glitchy songfests.”

Their ultimate aim?

“To bring people together and have them collaborate on karaoke duets. […] Using free versions of Skype, Youtube and collaborative web software TinyChat, we orchestrate duets between people who have never met each other, who don’t speak the same language, bypassing thousands of geographic miles with glitchy, highly compressed data and a bit of patience.”

There’s something altogether wonderful and utopian about the idea of singing together with strangers across the Internet, our voices traveling through electric wires and pixelated through the winds of the earth. Our imperfection is moving, our technological and organic errors a fundamental part of what it means to be homo sapien. Thus, the glitch or “glti.ch”, either aesthetic glitches or broken translation in the filtered collaboration between people, represents our contemporary human condition.

GLTI.CH quotes Iman Moradi, “In a sense we are cherishing the little idiosyncrasies that are absent from the soulless machines churned from the production lines.”

We can read this as a simultaneous celebration of and reaction to the glistening Internet, which brings us together virtually but also limits our interaction with each other in RL. Is this a bad thing? What is GLTI.CH Karaoke, really? Its medium revolves around the Web and site-based events; its outcome encompasses social media platforms, blogs and video compilations. Perhaps what the project ultimately aims to achieve is to forge a new way of seeing, evoking a new simulative way of collaboration with other people in a brave new world.

“GLTI.CH Karaoke not only inhabits the errors, the time delays and compression artifacts, but the ultimate variable of human interaction. Here, we believe, a neutral collaborative space can be mapped out, free to transcend markets, locations, time zones – free to roam between abandoned city basements, student bed sits and internet café laptops. GLTI.CH Karaoke events revel in the slippery nature of the web. Our manifesto asks to be written and rewritten as it gathers cracks, bruises and mistranslation errors.”

Enchanted yet? Read through GLTI.CH Karaoke’s previous events and keep a look out for its next virtual intervention on their website, flickr, twitter, facebook and youtube. Let us know what you think of glitch aesthetics in the comments below.

Mimi Winsor

Mimi Winsor graduated from Chelsea after what was a marathon show of twice-daily performances of her piece ‘Squeeze, pinch, stretch, roll, dollop and extrude’. The work consisted of large welded-iron structures which made up a sort of playdough sausage factory. White-clad and hatted factory workers kneaded, slapped and heaved 1 tonne of dough through Mimi’s contraptions over the course of the show. It twirled, plopped and mashed through machines in an often hilarious manner before the workers rushed it to the ‘extruder’ where it was finally processed, forming long pink sausages.

It looks like hard work and results in an ambitious, sensory and playful performance-piece which, rather than being simply sculptural, actually churns out art itself! Sculptures/sausages were for sale per lb.- a tickling nod towards the tricky conventions of selling degree show work. This constant, haphazard growth ended in a sea of extruded dough, the workers struggling, everything pink and mushy.

After completing various exciting builds such as a gigantic sea anemone for the Discovery Channel HQ, Mimi’s degree show also won her a commission on the giant Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground at Chelsea. In similarly dramatic style, she is creating a prison complete with prisoners to function in the open square. The piece called ‘Grinding the Wind’ references the history of the site which used to house MiIlbank Prison and involves Mimi’s own ‘correctional labour device’, inspired by the victorian Treadwheel Fan. The prisoners will operate the contraption in performances that nod to not only the ideas of process in art but also often absurd and pointless labour.

Catch a performance outside Chelsea (next to Tate Britain) from Thursday 17th October to Sunday 3rd November with performances on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays at 11:30am and 2pm. Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground, Chelsea College of Art and Design, SW1P 4JU.

 

All images copyright Mimi Winsor, www.mimiwinsor.com

Aliyah Hussain

Aliyah Hussain graduated from Manchester Metropolitan University with first class honors in Interactive Arts.In 2009 she received the Google Photography Award, exhibiting at the Saatchi Gallery in London. Her projects include costume designs, video installations and cross discipline collaborations. She confidently works between the fields of printmaking, performance and photography to name a few. She blends together traditional and contemporary, everyday objects and imaginary visions.

Gouache painted on top of a photograph represent a successful combination of opposite mediums in an artwork. Painted geometrical forms create distorted perspective, where figures become almost architectural models, transforming landscape captured in the photograph into an artificial scenery.

Her works merge intricate detailing with free painterly approach. She creates vibrant and elegant drawings of imagined flying machines, kites and satellites, or a flattened out carousel. Aliyah finds aesthetics in technology, converting technical drawings into visions of futuristic machines.

Collaboration is also a big part of her work. She is a member of the collective Volkov Commanders, “a group of artists who devised a unified alter ego to create collaborative sculptural and performance works that explore the boundaries between visual art, dance and costume.”

To see more of her works, visit her website www.aliyahhussain.co.uk and www.volkovcommanders.co.uk/

 

Ashley Nieuwenhuizen

Original ideas, questioning mind, touch of mystical atmosphere and collaboration between materials and means of expression are qualities that made me interested in this artist.

Ashley Nieuwenhuizen was born in South Africa, but moved to Scotland in 1988, and is now working in Dundee. She combines experiences of different cultures and environments in provoking and psychological art works. Investigating the merge between human made urban surroundings and mysterious animal environment, she makes a statement on connections between animal and human worlds. Her work is an amalgamation of natural and synthetic, beautiful and grotesque, animal and man.

She graduated from Duncan of Jordanstone with a Master in Fine Art in 2010 and has participated in several group exhibitions internationally and in the United Kingdom. She was awarded the William Sangster Phillips Fund, Dundee Visual Artists Award and the Sir William Gillies Bequest Award.

Ashley Nieuwenhuizen uses video, sculpture, printmaking and performance to explore the similarities between man and animal, then transform them into fantastical creatures. This is a wondrous metamorphosis that addresses the viewer’s psychological experiences and affinity between a man and a beast.

In her works nature is almost adapted to human environment, animals are altered and transformed to such an extent that they become unnatural. This atmosphere of abnormality and unreality questions today’s environment and is a reflection on our culture and mankind.

To view more of her works, visit this website http://morphbody.weebly.com/