Fashion Graduate Finds ‘The Fix’

Its always the women’s lifestyle and fashion magazines that dominate the bookshelves in shops, while men’s fashion magazines are either hidden at the bottom, or in Britain’s case, nearly non-existant. The world has been waiting for a welcoming way for men to dress well – without having to try to afford a 5-digit look from GQ.

India Gladstone has found The Fix for Men, an iPad and iPhone app that carefully selects and pieces together affordable and wearable men’s clothing for certain occasions.

With a simple layout and no-nonsense approach, the app is straightforward enough for any male to navigate and select a specific occasion he may want to dress for, or possibly find a few staple pieces, how they are put together, and prices before he heads out to the high street.

“I’ve always been interested in menswear and personal style,” says Scotland-born UK native and recent London College of Fashion graduate India Gladstone. Gladstone is one of six siblings, two of those being brothers, who are keen on always feeling comfortable and aware of the clothing they put on. “I have always been surrounded by men who are interested in what they wear, in the sense that great clothing gives you character. But men don’t always need to be completely fashion-conscious like women do. I was never fully aware of the lack of simple style guides for men until I attended fashion school.”

It was this realisation that led Gladstone to devise an idea for an app that would interview insiders in a casual manner for those who aren’t always clinging on to each and every trend. The app is clean, minimal, and laid out simply, with tabs for occasion, journal, or an edited selection of buys for everyday clothing that would suit any man who does not necessarily have all the time in the world to file through the clothing racks.

“I understand that men these days prefer to online shop, but then again they aren’t completely aware of what is available to them, or what to wear for certain occasions if they aren’t given some sort of direction by a friend or a website. It is unlikely a man is going to pick up a fashion magazine the way girls do,” India explains.

The Fix contains an editors section, a style guide based on occasion, Instagram favourites, and a selection of street style.

“I find menswear much more interesting, its very personal and particular to a man’s personality if he is wearing a certain style or brand,” says Gladstone, “I just hope that men realise it is simple and shouldn’t be stressful or expensive to try to dress well. With this app, men won’t show up in jeans and a t-shirt to a business casual cocktail party.”

The Fix is set to launch later this year, look out for it for your iPads, Androids or Smartphones.

Rachel Neath. Trend Forecaster.

When we think of ‘a career in fashion’ it’s probably likely our minds will drift to the stereotypes of a budding young Newgen designer, a chiselled, cheek boned model-to-be or perhaps the infamous socialite it-girl springs to mind. But nobody seems to land on the brains behind the whole operation, the humble trend forecaster. As it’s my new duty to stalk down the most emerging of British talent, particularly within fashion, I thought it most appropriate to start at the top of the ladder with the ideas people, the forecasters.

On behalf of Gola’s Born in Britain, let me introduce you to a bright star in this rather gloomy city sky, Rachel Neath. A Fashion Management and Marketing student and WGSN intern by day and a trend absorber by night and pretty much every minute she has free. As a fellow FMM student, I can be honest in saying Rachel is that girl who’s work pops up and slaps you in the face just when you thought you were doing quite well, however she’s too sugary sweet to pretend to hate or envy; the best concoction for this industry. Her work is modern, simplistic and eloquently put together, each little detail agonised over until perfection, whilst solid, game-changing trends take centre stage with a range of research to back them up and prove why they are so relevant.

With such a skill of trend forecasting it could be argued she’s quite the superhero to some but when asked what superpower she would most prefer she answered; ‘Omnilinguism, the ability to understand any form of language. How perfect – I could travel without any language barrier issues!’

Here’s a little interview I did with the lady herself..

Where do you gain inspiration for your trend forecasting?

– Everywhere, literally. I look into everything from new technology, science advances, art and design, architecture.. everything! I also follow a lot of blogs; I use my facebook account as an easy way of keeping up-to-date with everything ‘new’ by liking interesting blog pages so that my feed is constantly feeding me new information. Some of my favourites include thisiscollosal.com , gizmodo.co.uk and dezeen.com

Where do you find the inspiration for your modern and clean cut layouts?

– I am obsessed with layout! To the point where I will spend 3 hours looking for one perfect font. I gain inspiration for layout from looking at other publications. I tend to look at a lot of quirky magazines, websites, freebie mags from fashion stores and my university provides us with a yearbook which includes some snapshot images of previous student work which is a great source of inspiration. 

How has working at WGSN influenced you?

– Working with WGSN has given me a tremendous insight into how forecasting companies are ran and what makes a successful forecasting company. I work with the ‘What’s in Store’ team, which is WGSNs most widely used directory and is an invaluable industry resource covering the latest retail trends from store windows across the globe including product trends and visual merchandising. I’ve learnt how to analyse trends more effectively and write short and sharp reports. 

How long do you find it takes to pull together/establish a good trend?

– For the purpose of this particular project we had a couple of months at least however it would have been great to have had a couple more weeks of research. I think for me about a month per trend. So for a finished trend book I guess around 3 months.

What advice would you give to your past self?

– Stop worrying!    

Puppies or kittens?

– Argh that’s the most difficult question you’ve asked! They’re both so great. I pick both.

And most importantly,  Male pin-up? 

– Johnny Depp.  

If like us, you’ve been coaxed into a state of admiration towards the talented Miss Neath and you quite simply cannot get enough then don’t fret, why not send your peepers over to her issuu page for more trend forecasting deliciousness. Alternatively, you can attempt to employ her or at least stalk her a little before she gets snapped up for good by the likes of WGSN or Mudpie via her Linkedin.