September Sky

This week I caught up with a fantastic young band, who have been working hard to develop their unique style. Hertfordshire based September Sky are an extremely talented group with both songwriting talent and awesome performance ability. With a string of upcoming shows the band are becoming more well known, with their talents continuing to develop. Definitely one to watch! Their music is deep, memorable and very catchy. I highly recommend you check them out, and definitely make it to one of their gigs if your in the hertfordshire, london area! With all great bands you haven’t fully experienced them, until you’ve seen them live. I caught up with the guys to ask them a few questions:

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Tell me a bit about your musical style as a band

Our style is one we like to say we found on our own. It is based around a pop punk/Alternative style with some post hardcore mixed in.

What influences and inspires you most, when creating your music?

I think we all have different influences, but that’s where our sound comes from. By each of us having our own we create something new. Mostly alternative bands like Paramore and Fightstar to Interpol, Coheed and Cambria, Evanescence and many others.

As a group, have you found if difficult to establish your style, or has it just come naturally?

We feel it came quite naturally, we enjoy what we play and we all seem to write music in a very similar style to each other so there’s not really much of a struggle to fit each other into one style, especially considering the diversity of music we listen to. Sometimes difficulties can come along for us when writing but once the ball gets rolling things come a lot easier.

What are your thoughts on the british music scene of today?

Different. Very different! It’s funny to see just how much music changes over the years and we think that if you go looking for them, there are hundreds of fantastic bands around, no matter what style or genre you prefer. We’ve played with such a huge range of bands and most nights we’ve found something we’ve really enjoyed and gotten into. There is so much creativity around where as, probably due to restrictions on freedom, some big signed bands can be lacking in something sometimes, but all n all the British scene is good

Finally where can our readers see more of you guys in the future? Do you have any up and coming shows or projects?

You can check out our Facebook page and our twitter

A few of our songs can be found on youtube and on our band page. 

And we have a video in the works so keep an eye out for us

The gigs we got coming up are 
20th July Bridgehouse, London
19th October Asylum Chelmsford
We hope to see you all there 

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I hope you enjoyed that guys! Be sure to check out the band online to be the first to hear about new songs and upcoming shows!

Twitter

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Youtube

 

Rory Green

This week I had the pleasure of getting to know a fantastic young artist from Essex. I’m a big Art fan myself, and I think it’s so interesting seeing what the young British art scene of today has to offer. As an artist, Rory is incredibly passionate and dedicated to his art. His pieces are deep, meaningful, yet still beautifully intriguing and visually effective. Drawing from both classic influences, and modern topics, Rory creates relatable works that speak to the audience. I find it’s rare in young artists to find someone that is not only talented, but knowledgable on what’s going on in the world of art today. Because of this Rory is someone who will continue to develop his work, bringing us more and more. One to watch, and a true British original. Here’s what he had to say:

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Tell me about yourself as an artist

I’m Rory I’m 21 and I do art at the University Of Hertfordshire. I’ve just finished my second year and I’ve probably gone the most long winded way about doing a Fine Art Degree. From leaving sixth form I did a foundation diploma at ware college, a foundation degree at war college and NOW, as most people I was at Ware with are leaving university I’m about to enter my third year at University Of Hertfordshire. My art work usually centres around myself and my reactions, thoughts and observations on what is around me from pop culture to my personal family life. I’ve been told that I’m a concept artist and I’d largely agree with that. My work takes all manor of forms from painting and photography to installation often trying to mix them all in some way to create my work.

What are the influences and inspirations behind your latest works?

Football. Football is the inspiration behind my current work because its what I’m surrounded by constantly. I’m football fan and however that is not the reason why I’ve chosen football as the subject of my latest body of work. My brother is a professional footballer so I see a different side of the beautiful game to that of the ninety minutes you see at a weekend. My work is challenging the public perception of football and footballers both culturally and whether they have a place in fine art. It’s an ongoing theme at the moment because I feel it’s something I can really sink my teeth into and enjoy creating work about. My most recent body of work shows photographs of myself dressed in my brothers football kits, England kits and Manchester United kits, a painting of myself showing a sort of tribute to a Peter Blake painting, a green canvas with football boots on it, a painting of myself holding a football and a football, on a plinth with the words “god is dead, football is your new religion” upon it. My aim for my work is to get a reaction out of my audience and get people to really think about what the hell I’m conveying. I like to keep it autonomous and allow the public to have their own opinion-I won’t force the meaning upon them.

Football unifies people the world over and I feel that art does that too. There are many similarities between the two for me. Grass roots football is no different to an art student at school, college or university and the galleries you show your work in is the same to the leagues in professional football with the big names and big buyers being the premiership.

As a young artist, have you found it difficult to establish your own style?

I think it’s hard for any young artist to find their own style whilst they are at university. You’re constantly being told to research and go to galleries to see what’s new, current, and modern in contemporary art and I think there is only so much information that you should and can take from what you’re seeing otherwise your instincts will be to work in a way which you know the outcome will be successful because it looks like what you saw last week in London. I’ve been guilty of that myself in the past and now coming to the end of my second year, I’ve found that I’m beginning to finally develop my own style. I was never one that wanted to do LOADS of research to inform my work however now I’ve found it’s about being selective with what you’re researching and selective with how you use it to inform your work…then your style will develop from what you yourself add to your research.

What are your thoughts on the British Art scene of today?

The British art scene today is ever growing under a pile of YBA comparison. Which isn’t as bad as it may sound. Yes the YBA’s were and still are the top draw in this countries top art galleries but they haven’t been young for twenty years. Yet what they did paved the way for art students like me to make the work I want to make. I think the British art scene is in a predicament of wanting to move away from the past and look to the future but the mainstream exposure for the future isn’t there. I’m a BIG fan of Sarah Maple right now. She’s going to be and SHOULD be our next biggest export however lazy comparisons of her being the heir to Tracey Emin’s thrown can hold her back instead of skyrocketing her, she’s brilliant. It’s a predicament because staging MASSIVE retrospectives generate LOADS of money and create a massive buzz about British art…but we should be making a fuss about the new young British artists that are making the noise now.

What can we expect to see from you in the future?

In the future I am going to finish my degree and possibly go on to do an MA…I’m more likely to do the MA and gather as much experience as I possibly can for when I finally leave. I have conflicting thoughts about wanting to teach or be a tutor with people that want to do art or just try it and go for it and be an artist. My work will keep growing as I do too, as corny as that sounds, but I’m going to keep on developing this body of work. One of the things I’ve learnt is that an artists artwork has to be a continuous line of enquiry rather than looking at it as “I’ve done one thing this semester and now I’m going to switch and look at some ing completely different” it has to flow and it has to be real. The best in anything whether its art, music, film…anything has to be real for it to be the best.

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Rory’s unique style and infectious passion for his art make him definitely one to watch in the future. I hope you enjoyed that as much as I did. To see more of Rory then get in touch:

Email: green.rory@hotmail.co.uk

Katie

Neverstar

Recently I had the pleasure of getting to know a fantastic new band, Neverstar. The incredible rock/metal band from Hertfordshire have hit the ground running, and have been churning out one awesome song after another. With a strong style they have developed over time, the band offer something different to the british music scene of today. The band themselves are all incredibly talented individuals, something that is rare in bands today. This of course helps them to create songs that are both well written, and performed, but also refreshing to listen to. I urge you to give them a try. Here’s what they had to say:

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Tell me a bit about your musical style as a band

We play a mixture of modern rock and symphonic metal. Musically we like to experiment and come up with something a little different.

What influences and inspires you most, when creating your music?

It can really be anything from a guitar riff, something on the news or even personal experiences.

As a group, have you found if difficult to establish your style, or has it just come naturally?

In the beginning we played around with various things, and it did take some time to find what feels authentically Neverstar. It definitely took some work to get to where we are today.

What are your thoughts on the British music scene of today?

It’s an exciting time, as there’s so many interesting new bands using influences from all kinds of genres. 

Do you have any advice for young musicians?

Perfect your craft, give it everything you’ve got and don’t give up.

Finally where can our readers see more of you guys in the future? Do you have any up and coming shows or projects?

We are working on new songs as we always do, and hope to get a second album out in a year or so. Gig wise, we’ll be playing in Southampton on 14 July and in Welwyn Garden City on 30 August.

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If you want to see more of Neverstar, or want to find out when you can see then live, then head over to their website now, they won’t disappoint you!

Website

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Twitter

Jemma Thorne

This week I had the pleasure of chatting to an amazing illustrator from Hertfordshire; Jemma Thorne. She has such a unique style that conveys so much raw personality and depth that I’ve been hooked from the first encounter. Her impeccable skill when it comes to drawing and line art, allow her to communicate her visions effortlessly, allowing her pieces to capture the imagination of the audience. She has developed her work over the years to combine beautifully detailed illustrations, with bold block colours. This has created an edginess in her pieces that is so infectious, with her sense of humour always shining through. Her work is both unique yet timeless, with something for everyone. I implore you to spend some time enjoying her work as I have been. Here’s what she had to say:

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Can you tell me a little bit about your style and your work?

My style of work involves detailed, and often laborious, line work that I then scan into my computer and colour on Photoshop. This approach works for me because my work is best suited with a flat, limited colour palette to show off the strong, clean line work. I find myself drawing most things, but I particularly enjoy drawing items of clothing and interesting objects. My work can be quite satirical at times, commenting on the many issues of the world, but I also enjoy working on a purely aesthetic level, helping me to develop my illustration style.

The Gola campaign is called “Born in Britain” are there any british artists or illustrators that inspire you?

An illustrator that inspires me for his genius humour and opinions that he puts forward in his illustrations, is the very talented Peter Brookes.
In terms of style, I adore the work of a lesser known illustrator called Jonathan Williams. Situated in Scotland, he has produced some great works for clients such as Virgin and The Times. I came across his work recently while researching for a project. His style is beautiful, clean and his use of colour is exquisite.

Your work is so visually effective, but it is also funny and expressive. Do you feel you are able to express yourself and your personality through your work?

I feel I am able to express my many opinions through my artwork and that it can often have a much punchier and hard-hitting effect than by trying to express this with words alone. It allows me to poke at things I feel are wrong or right about life and the universe in a, hopefully, more eye-catching and effective way.
An example of this would be my final major project that uses the alphabet to highlight all the issues (in my eyes) that our country faces.

Do you have any tips for young illustrators, trying to develop their craft and their style?

Practice, practice, practice. I have drawn obsessively every day since I was old enough to hold a pencil. I think there is an element of having a natural talent when it comes to drawing, but I think what’s more important is how hard you work and how much you want to make it. You will always have doubts about yourself and your work, but by realising what your weaknesses are you can develop your skills more.
You learn as much from your peers as you do from highly successful, professional illustrators. By looking at what others do better than you, and trying to reconcile that in your own work, you can strive to get your work to the best it can be.

I think the key to being a good illustrator is to never be satisfied. Friends and family laugh at me for being a ‘perfectionist’ and never being completely satisfied with my work, despite giving it my all. But that has allowed me to push myself further each time. There’s nothing better than looking back at earlier work and realising how much you have improved!

Finally, where do you hope to be in the next few years?

I am hoping to combine my two great passions in life: illustration and teaching. I hope to be able to maintain a steady job in education as well as taking on freelance commissions. Drawing is a massive part of my life and I hope to be doing it until the day I die!

If anyone is interesting at looking at a bigger collection of my work, I would be happy to send you an online PDF. My e-mail address is: jemmathorne01@yahoo.co.uk

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Well I hope you enjoyed that as much as I enjoyed talking to Jemma! Go ahead and email Jemma for any work enquiries, or just to learn more about her pieces.

Katie