FORLANE 6 STUDIO

The surface below the sea hosts enchanting worlds. Acting as a space for the unknown and the mysterious, the depths of the sea offers endless possibilities when it comes to exploration and the association with the unconscious part of our psyche.

Seemingly hostile to human presence, the underwater worlds are actually strongly influenced by human activity, hosting large quantities of forgotten artificial materials and objects. Forlane 6 is a duo project of two artists, Hortense Le Calvez and Mathieu Goussin,that intends to question and imagine how organic shapes cohabit when transformed and positioned in the context of a foreign space inaccessible to human life.

Objects are metamorphosed into artificial natures before being installed under the current of air or water, after which their buoyancy can be explored and re-imagined. Eerie and weirdly soothing and satisfying, the almost science fiction mise en scène is rendered effective through the contrast between fantastic worlds and familiar materials.

Forlane 6 Studio freezes aerial movements through photography and videos, blurring the edge between reality and fantasy. Referring to the post-human age and the frozen time frame of the deep sea, the Forlane 6 project gives an autonomous voice to the inanimate.

The man-made installations’ discourse mimics living creatures in a setting free from it, thus rendering the dichotomy between autonomous life and still life effective and challenging.

Mathieu and Hortense currently live and work on their forty years old sailing boat, Forlane 6, currently based in the Aegean Sea.

You can visit Forlane 6 website here: http://forlane6studio.com

 

Jing Hu

I first came across Jing Hu’s work at the University of the Arts London’s Freshers Fair last year, when we shared various works with each other as fellow fine art students. I was immediately blown away by the illustrative style of her paintings, possessing at once a very distinctive Chinese quality yet also the influence of western antiquity.

Her colour palettes ranges from vibrant reds to monochromatic greys, but the vast majority of her work have subdued, introspective undertones. The stylised, sometimes hybrid characters stare solemnly back at the observer, haunting in their androgynous, anime beauty and poised in frozen inertia. They sit or lounge or stand in luxurious, traditional settings or strangely fantastical landscapes. Doe-like eyes seem to accuse the viewer of something – you’re not sure exactly what, but they seem to be trying to communicate a story to you.

With a stroke of her brush, Jing Hu weaves an unspoken narrative between the threads of her seductive characters as she “explores ideas around flux, migration, urban-life with aesthetic codes as markers of identity and aspirations.” Essentially, her work elevates the banality of modern life to the realm of urban mythology.

To follow Jing Hu’s journey and view more of her works in her eclectic portfolio (which also includes mixed media art), visit her website.

Steph Carr

Steph Carr is a contemporary fine artist, who has just finished her degree at Sheffield Hallam University. Her work is both wonderfully conceptual and thought provoking, whilst still being beautifully executed. Her latest work is intricate and visually stunning, adding depth to the ideas behind each piece. In a time where contemporary artists are common, it’s rare to fine one with so much thought behind each piece, whilst still maintaining quality and visual effect. This is something that makes Steph special, and I urge you to see more of her. Here’s what she had to say:

Tell me about yourself as an artist

I’ve just graduated from BA Hons Contemporary Fine Art at Sheffield Hallam University. I work with everyday domestic materials, commonly found and used in the home currently to create objects that change themselves from waste material to objects of desire that you want to return to the home. I have a fascination for that transformation stage, the moment something changes from rubbish to some form of spectacle, offering a new way of looking. Being hands on is really important for me, in everything I do I aim for the materials to remain honest and for there to be signs of the objects being handmade. Taking inspiration from the in between moments in our everyday lives, materials show themselves be it a pile of used teabags or discarded material the textures and colours found in these objects is what I take away to make something new. My work has a deep routed focus on perception of beauty and I aim to create things that we actively want in our homes and lives.

What are the influences and inspirations behind your latest works?

My latest work seen in my degree show ‘The Discarded Made Tangible (Sweepings)’ was a creation of wallpaper. We drink hundreds of cups of tea within the home each month and the overriding waste was impossible to ignore. I began collecting the used teabags and in the drying out process placed them onto paper, the pattern and colour left on the paper by the bag was so beautiful I took this and created a wallpaper design. After a battle trying to reproduce the pattern by hand on the paper it became clear a digital aid was needed so I used a combination of Photoshop help to create the design and hands on approach by screen-printing the design by hand on to lining paper. For the purpose of the degree show it was important for me to offer clues to the viewer as to what materials had been used, so I matched the pigments as closely as possible to a tea staining. There are many references that flood into this work; the main points are the amount we use and waste in our homes and also the possibilities of those waste materials. I feel that the use of tea offers many links dependant on the viewer; some have referenced the similarities to Victorian wallpapers and the importance of the tea trade in that period, some have noticed similarities to the Rorschach inkblot test that uses pareidolia (seeing things in abstract inkblot images) in an attempt to gain insight into a person’s mental state. For me, I want the viewer to feel they want to remove the piece from the gallery space and return it to the home, where the material was collected and used.

As a young artist, have you found it difficult to establish your own style?

I think for any artist the pressure to find ‘a style’ is always the black sheep in the room. For me, going through the motions of university has been the best way to find out what I am interested in and how I want to progress with my work. It seems to have come from nowhere really, but when you think about the amount of information you soak up being surrounded by other artists in the form of tutors, outside professionals and peers it all contributes to your way of working and thinking. In my final year something seemed to change, a focusing of ideas (maybe the pressure of the degree show contributed!) and putting a piece of work in to the gallery space as your final university piece spurs you on to push yourself. There are some amazing opportunities for creative in this country and I find inspiration in all media’s and areas, the main thing I would say to any young artist is to just keep going! Wherever you go and whatever you see you take something with you and all of these aspects come together to form your ‘style’. I am still learning and growing as I think every artist does and with every piece I make there is more that I would like to do to it and new ideas that arise from putting a realised work in to a space.

What are your thoughts on the British Art scene of today?

Some of my greatest inspirations have been from British artists; I find the work of artists like Deborah Bowness (www.deborahbowness.com) so beautiful and they push me in my own mind and practice to keep going with an idea and to keep perfecting it. Bowness takes everyday objects such as lamps or chairs and uses photographs of them to create wallpaper, this can completely transform a space and offers solutions for those with little space in the home. She has also got a very interesting project on the go ‘The Paper Trail’ that takes disused spaces on our streets and papers them, drawing attention not only to her work but to the tragedy of our British high street where shops are closing down every day and spaces are being wasted. There are so many inspirational artists around and they keep emerging as more and more creative arise from schools, universities and colleges. Another huge inspiration for me is Timorous Beasties, their mainly hand-printed wallpapers and designs are so grand and beautiful, they are well known for their contemporary take on the traditional ‘Toile De Jouy’ pattern of Napoleonic France however they recreate scenes in a similar style of modern cities.

What can we expect to see from you in future?

I’m not too sure what the future holds! I am interested in many mediums including illustration photography and craft so I hope to always be involved in something creative. In an ideal world I would love to continue working on designs for wallpapers, fabrics and other aspects of the home however I am not sure how this would be possible currently! I will always be a creative person and in one way or another I know this passion will filter through to all aspects of my life. If nothing else, I just hope to offer some form of inspiration to those who see my work. In a society where we have no focus on what we use or waste, as it is so readily available to us, I hope to elevate the potential of what is in front of us to a position of significance.

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To find out more about this young artist and her work, contact her via her email:  carr_stephanie91@live.co.uk

 

Ekin Balcioglu

Ekin Balcioglu is a recent graduate of Central Saint Martins School of Art and Design, where she received her BA in Menswear, and where she wishes to continue on to her MA.

Despite her fashion background, Ekin has drawn and painted most of her life – She decided to study menswear at CSM in an effort to combine her interests of shape, volume, and texture within her usual every day practice of painting and water-based media. Her interests grew into blurring the boundaries between mediums, taking the solidity of fabrics and the fluidity of painting and producing what has become more fine art than fashion. However, despite this difference, Ekin has so far been awarded several prizes for her work in painting/drawing figures.

The artist’s interest in water-based media stems from the unpredictability of it – Unlike other mediums, she doesn’t have complete control over the final outcome, resulting in abstract, blurring forms. Her ‘Untitled’ ink on paper series reflects her interest in the form, specifically that of the human form, and how that, combined with the fluidity and unpredictability of the ink, can create almost anamorphic, animal-like, formless beings.

 

– Killian

Soo Eun Baik

Soo Eun Baik is a Korean artist living and working in both Seoul and London. She has received her BA and MA degrees in Fine Art from Chelsea College of Art and Design.

Soo Eun’s work focuses predominantly on the medium of painting – utilizing watercolour, gouache and acrylic paints to achieve her desired pieces. Following her MA course at Chelsea, Soo Eun decided to focus on and then later on stick to painting the landscape in watercolour – This stemming from her interest in the medium’s translucent, fluid consistency, relating back to her relationships between (what she refers to as) her inner and outer spaces. The landscape becomes a metaphor for integrating these inner and outer spaces in association with the finished painting’s material property.

Through an abstraction of her perspective, tone and colour, she releases a surrealistic, fantastical environment that appears if from a transient, dream world.

To see more of Soo Eun’s work, feel free to visit her website here – http://www.sooeunbaik.com/

 

– Killian

Tommy Ramsay

Tommy Ramsay is a recent graduate of Chelsea College of Art and Design, where he received his BA in Fine Art.

At first glance, Tommy Ramsay’s work appears way too abstract to be understood straight away. However, with the right context and enough concentration, it is easy for the viewer to become almost completely immersed into the artist’s paintings. Stemmed from the idea of re-contextualizing and re-figuring every day, common spaces, Ramsay deliberately looks to combine the every day with the unrecognizable – the ‘non-places’, as the artist refers to them. The artist re-addresses these ‘non-places’ within the every day, giving them some sort of value and merit, looking to find an interpretation to them that would otherwise have been unknown before. He looks for specific details in these spaces – Rubbish, wear and tear, human interference – Anything that can become re-contextualized and brought to life in his paintings. By painting these spaces in his abstract, surrealist style, Ramsay allows the audience to delve into a place where time is slowed down, experience evolves and the space becomes a new, unrecognizable experience – Breathing new life into the painting.

 

– Killian

 

 

Introducing.. Eleanor Cunningham

Eleanor Cunningham is a recent MA Fine Arts graduate of Chelsea College of Art and Design as well as a fine artist working with photography and mixed media based in London.

Eleanor’s work is based upon the application of traditional and new technologies in relation to photography. As a medium that is constantly ever-changing, especially with its digital technologies, Eleanor is interested in the future and outcome of photography as a medium and art form. Her work focuses predominantly on the physicality of photography – The loss of it, as a result of recent digital culture. In creating her work, she explores how the content of her imagery determines this loss of physicality, as well as new ways in which to present it beyond the physical print.

Eleanor explains that she does not have full control in her development processes, which leaves way for mistakes and error – But she further goes on to explain that, “this element is important, as it leaves traces within the image (such as dust marks and scratches) that brings it closer and seems more real to us – as we ourselves have imperfections.” The artist’s use of manipulation, as well – whether by heat, coloured dyes, changes in emulsion or medium – transports the viewer into an alternative universe, retracing and re-analyzing objects and places in ways that were otherwise unbeknownst to them.

There is definitely something utterly moving and captivating about this artist’s work, and I don’t doubt any successes that are there for her in the near future.

To find out more about Eleanor’s work, visit her website – www.cunningart.co.uk

– Killian

(All images courtesy of Eleanor Cunningham)