Fair-T

Quite unconsciously, a theme has begun to emerge in my fashion posts for Gola’s Born in Britain campaign: ethical and fair trade fashion initiatives are gaining significant momentum and are becoming an increasingly attractive alternative to high street fast fashion and I can’t seem to get enough of them.  A new fashion company based and set up by Naomi Wilde in 2013 called Fair-T has recently launched, and is seeking to engage not only ethically minded fashion fanatics, but also with the alternative and underground music scene in the UK such as the cult-classic Warehouse Project.

Having recently enjoyed a launch night at Joshua Brooks in the Oxford Road area of Manchester and a selling event at The University of Manchester Students’ Union, this fledgling brand looks to be going big places fast. Their selection of classic white T-shirts made from 100% Fair Trade cotton produced in India, featuring prints of astronauts, gas masks and wolf headdresses amongst others, are wearable and unfussy, perfect for pursuing a minimalist, no-frills look.

Although Fair-T markets itself as a menswear label, I see unisex potential in this brand and would feel quite comfortable sporting one of these ridiculously cool tees myself. With prices starting at £25, Fair-T hardly breaks the coffers, but offers something unique and off the beaten track.

In addition to providing a mail-order option for their collection, Fair-T provides a wholesale service. For more information and to start placing those orders, find them on their website, Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr.

Bhavna

In recent years, fashion fanatics have been turning away from high street, mass produced fast fashion in search of something more unique and, most importantly, ethically produced. For years, Fair Trade design houses like People Tree have been at the forefront of this socially conscious project of making high quality clothing in a high quality working environment. Now, more companies thinking along this mindset have begun to emerge, and Bhavna is one that I highly recommend to any ethically-minded fashion aficionado.

Bhavna Rishi founded the eponymously named company Bhavna, showcasing her first collection of scarves at London Fashion Week in 2010. Each scarf is designed in England and handcrafted in India, meaning that each has received lavish care and attention in its production and is unlike any other. As part of the production process, Bhavna educates individuals and communities in their rich textile heritage, teaching skills such as embroidery, smocking, dyeing and printing to ensure that these inimitable methods are not lost. In addition, the company steadfastly supports three charities: The Sacred Childhood Foundation, The Women Vikas Institute and Find Your Feet.

The scarves and kaftans themselves are exquisitely designed, distinctively colourful and translate from beach to city, and across spring, summer and autumn effortlessly. When I first encountered Bhavna’s work, I was immediately reminded of the flowing, statement kaftans seen on the likes of Serena Van Der Woodsen in Gossip Girl, reeking of sophistication and vibrancy. I have not been partial to much kaftan-wearing in the past, but with clothing of such material and ethical quality on offer, Bhavna may have just converted me!

Find out more on Facebook, Twitter and shop at http://bhavna.com/b/