Tori Stewart

You have to be blind to have missed the massive increase in colourful hair walking down both our high streets and catwalks recently. The pioneering salon at the root of this new craze is Bleach. Based in Dalston (east London), with a second salon in the basement of Topshop’s Oxford Street Store they’ve been blessing the nation with dip-dyes and crazy colours galore.

I took the opportunity to interview one of their newest techni-colour Bleach babes Tori Stewart…

So, bluntly, why hair? and why the love of coloured hair?

Honestly, when i was younger I wanted to be a car mechanic ahaha, its hard to believe really, but a family friend ended up getting me an internship at a salon and i loved it. I worked through the apprenticeships at a few salons but was craving something a bit different so I quite my job, moved to London and did a Foundation in Art. I think thats where i found my creative streak.

And now your working at Bleach, how’s that going?

Yea great! As soon as I saw the salon I knew I needed to work there! And there are so many inspirational people who work there, but yet they’re all just so relaxed.

Yea, you’ve got some great people working there.

I mean Tina Outen, she works at Bleach, and does some awesome editorial work, which is something I’d love to get into more.

Bleach, are involved in a lot of editorial and fashion work. Why is it you think that, excuse the fashion talk, hair has become the latest accessory? 

Ahaha yea. I mean your hair frames your face, even in the 90s people were using colour. Its just come back around stronger and a bit more fashion focused. Not just with grunge though, its really cross trend. I love that hair’s become something more that just stuff that grows out your head, people are paying more attention to it and becoming more experimental with it rather that being prim and proper.

So, if you could do anyone’s hair over who would you pick? 

Oh, I’ve no idea… Jesus?? ahahaha

What like the technicolour dream coat?

Ahahaha, wasn’t that Joseph?

I don’t think he’d much fancy a virgin bleach with blue & purple flashes though ahahaha. Failing that I’d turn a horse into a unicorn with 90s glitter hair extensions and ride it through the centre of london.

Ahahaha, fab. So, 2014’s just begun, what are you hoping to do this year?

Work wise, I really want to extend on my experimentation when it comes to hair and bring in my foundation work more, and take on some more editorial photoshoots.

Great! Happy New Year then.

Tori’s Blog

Bleach’s Website

Tina Outen’s Info

 

 

Susan Campbell. Print Designer.

Central Saint Martins is known for churning out it’s one-of-a-kinds, geniuses and go-getters. Take a quick peek at the alumni and you find the likes of Luella Bartley, Peter Blake and M.I.A to name a few. Well, this little lady is no exception.

Meet Susan Campbell, a Textile Design graduate and print designing enthusiast. The Congleton-born, bob-flaunting individual quite frankly has the patience of a saint with her intricate, neoprene print design but boy, does it pay off.

Susan’s heroic creative process involves drawing her initial designs onto Adobe Illustrator as vector lines, then printing out these designs and deciphering where she will place her colours followed by breaking the design up into various pieces, again on Illustrator. After this, she laser cuts the designs onto coloured neoprene, leaving her with a thousand tiny jigsaw pieces. From here on she pieces those neoprene nuggets back together on a glue coated lycra base and voila! To see the agonising journey itself from drawing to dream, head over to her tumblr.

Currently working at Ted Baker taking on the role of Womenswear Print Assistant and spending her London days like any young print designer should; picnicking, partying and printing. I caught up with the Campbell herself and asked her the all important question of which One Direction member she would kidnap and keep..

 

One Direction then.. who would be the member of choice?

– Zayn, without a doubt.

So then, onto print I suppose. What tickles your fancy in the way of inspiration for your prints?

– I love going to exhibitions, looking at blogs and magazines and genuinely, just walking a lot gives me inspiration from the things I see along the way.

Who is the ‘Susan Campbell’ consumer you have in mind when designing your prints?

– Someone who is playful yet sophisticated. Someone that doesn’t take themselves too seriously. 

If you could pluck out a celeb of choice to be donning your designs, who would it be?

– Robyn. 

How would you describe your own personal style?

– Colourful and sporty with lots of leopard print.

Fashion icons?

Eva Fontanelli and The Queen. 

New York, Paris, London or Milan?

– London.

What do you love about where you live right now?

– Everything you could ever want is on Bethnal Green Road. Literally, anything from David Beckham pencil cases to giant bubble machines! I also love that you can never become bored because there is always something fun going on.

Share a charming anecdote (no pressure.)

– I broke my collarbone aged 10 whilst dressed as a prostitute. I had to go straight to hospital unchanged..

And what does the future hold for Miss Campbell?

– Good question! A lot of enjoyment hopefully. I’m also working to push my ideas and concepts in a way I’m really excited about.

You heard it here first ladies and gents! Want even more from Miss C? Well, isn’t that what good ol’ social media is all about? Have a peep at her wonderfully artistic Bethnal Green life via her instragram or maybe even pop over to her official website.

 

Fung Yee Wai

Fung Yee is a recent graduate of Huddersfield University, with a bold passion and flair for Graphic design and paper craft. Her latest pieces are beautiful, intricate paper sculptures that will leave you in awe. Her work is not only clean and crisp, but also well thought out. She is able to communicate strong messages and concepts through her pieces, making them real show stoppers. With a string of awards already under her belt, this young designer is set to hit the ground running and take the design world by storm. I am totally in love with her pieces and I’m sure you will be too. Here’s what she had to say when I caught up with her recently:

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Tell me a little bit about yourself and your work

I am a british born chinese girl with a love for paper-craft. This love started off as a general hobby during my high school days, making some origami cranes. It wasn’t until my final year at University that I took this hobby further and developed it into a refined skill.

Your work has such a clear and distinctive style. Has it been difficult developing this, since you are still a young designer?

Yes, it has been rather difficult discovering this skill and style but with the support and encouragement from my tutor, Mr Brent Hardy-Smith, I managed to really challenge myself and create something new.

What were the inspirations for your latest pieces?

My latest white models are each based on a real event around the world, so you have the Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta, Montreal Jazz Festival, Day of the Dead, Cannes International Film Festival, Oktoberfest and Gion Matsuri (a Japanese summer festival).

Your work is always new, fresh and experimental. What can we expect to see from your next pieces?Will you be trying anything new in the future, or just perfecting your craft?

Haha, good question Katie, it will be a bit of both really. I would like to take on and learn new areas of design to build on my design skills but simultaneously, I would also like to continue crafting. It’s a difficult question to answer but we will see how things go!

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If you want to see more of fung yee’s work then visit her behance portfolio to see more of her stunning designs, and to also get in touch!

Behance: www.behance.net/fungyee

Edinburgh College of Art Textile Design Graduates Part One

The Textile Design department at Edinburgh College of Art is always full of hardworking students amongst a vivid display of patterns, drawings, colour, fabric samples and an array of colour. Inspiration behind this years graduates work ranges from growing up in the 90s to a tiny Eastern European village called Koniakow famous for its crochet. As well as exhibiting at Edinburgh College of Art’s degree show the inspiring graduates have also just returned from exhibiting at New Designers in London showcasing their designs to various designers and those in the industry.

Katrina Bell‘s collection (main image) ‘a nod to nostalgia’ is a bright and quirky interior collection aimed at new parents who want to recall their childhood in the 1970s/80s. Stamps, shapes and colour is really important to her collection which involved traditional screen printing, heat press techniques and embroidery on woolen blankets, drawer liners, cushions and fabric samples. Alongside her youthful approach to design, Katrina has an array of skills and with plenty of experience during work placements in industry (and a few in the pipeline!) the future is very bright (and colourful). See for yourself on her  website

Kirsty McCann‘s collection (left image) is a definite must see for anyone who grew up in the 90s. ‘Acceptable in the 90s’ celebrates the 90s cliches, inflatable bubble bags, trolls and incredibly recreates the ‘scratch and sniff’craze through screenprinted scents on to fabrics. Bold, bright and unexpected Kirsty’s collection shows her skills in embroidery, screen printing, digital printing and hand embellishment. Relive your childhood on her website

Graduate designer Olivia May O’Connor’s collection is inspired by the act of collecting, birds, bones and historic, iconic textiles. Her atmospheric colour palette and great use of scale is really shown off in the eye catching curtains while her fabric samples combine leather, interior fabrics with digital printing, laser etching and traditional techniques. Olivia has amazing hand drawing skills (right image) and designs for both the Fashion and Interior market. She is a very versatile designer and won the Duchamp Luxury Menswear Digital Print competition while at university. Delve more into her collection on her website

 

 

Faye Galloway

Faye Galloway is a young and highly talented fashion designer, currently studying at Winchester School of Art, Southampton University. With her graduation just around the corner it won’t be long before her beautiful style of design is unleashed upon the world. Her work is so playful and expressive, allowing her to convey a strong androgynous style with light hints of femininity. This gives her work a rich depth that appeals to a vibrant and modern woman. But her style is by no means limited. With interests for colour and print, Faye’s work has developed over time to become versatile and flexible, whilst still maintaining her trademark aesthetic.

Faye’s broad interests both inside and outside of fashion have allowed her work to grow and adapt over time. She is also a talented illustrator, which allows her to convey her designs in beautiful and intricate illustrations.

Here’s what she had to say:

Can you tell me a little bit about your work and your style as a designer?

I specialise in fashion design but my work is very print orientated. I have a love for illustration and am forever drawing. I am drawn to colour and simplicity and this is always a starting point to starting a new project.

What has influenced your latest pieces?

I am currently working on my final major project and my main influences were collage, women and power. I recently visited the kurt schwitter exhibition, held at tate britain and felt instantly inspired by his work and the story portrayed about his immigration through the war. The silhouettes in my design process have been driven by androgyny and boyish looks with flirty hints of femininity. Reoccurring research within my project is imagery of mick and bianca jagger.

As well as being a talented designer, you also create beautiful illustrations of your pieces, will you ever branch out into over avenues of creativity besides fashion design?

I am a keen fashion illustrator so illustration is definitely an option I won’t cross out. Prior to my degree my work was very much about printed textiles, it is a path i still wish to pursue and am looking into studying at a higher level.

Where might we see you in the next few years?

After my degree I will be looking to apply for jobs in all of my interests whether is it fashion illustration, design or print for fashion.

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If you love Faye and her work as much as I do then feel free to get in touch with her to find out more about her work:

Email: fayegalloway@hotmail.com

Well I hope you all enjoyed that. Until next time…

Katie

Jemma Thorne

This week I had the pleasure of chatting to an amazing illustrator from Hertfordshire; Jemma Thorne. She has such a unique style that conveys so much raw personality and depth that I’ve been hooked from the first encounter. Her impeccable skill when it comes to drawing and line art, allow her to communicate her visions effortlessly, allowing her pieces to capture the imagination of the audience. She has developed her work over the years to combine beautifully detailed illustrations, with bold block colours. This has created an edginess in her pieces that is so infectious, with her sense of humour always shining through. Her work is both unique yet timeless, with something for everyone. I implore you to spend some time enjoying her work as I have been. Here’s what she had to say:

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Can you tell me a little bit about your style and your work?

My style of work involves detailed, and often laborious, line work that I then scan into my computer and colour on Photoshop. This approach works for me because my work is best suited with a flat, limited colour palette to show off the strong, clean line work. I find myself drawing most things, but I particularly enjoy drawing items of clothing and interesting objects. My work can be quite satirical at times, commenting on the many issues of the world, but I also enjoy working on a purely aesthetic level, helping me to develop my illustration style.

The Gola campaign is called “Born in Britain” are there any british artists or illustrators that inspire you?

An illustrator that inspires me for his genius humour and opinions that he puts forward in his illustrations, is the very talented Peter Brookes.
In terms of style, I adore the work of a lesser known illustrator called Jonathan Williams. Situated in Scotland, he has produced some great works for clients such as Virgin and The Times. I came across his work recently while researching for a project. His style is beautiful, clean and his use of colour is exquisite.

Your work is so visually effective, but it is also funny and expressive. Do you feel you are able to express yourself and your personality through your work?

I feel I am able to express my many opinions through my artwork and that it can often have a much punchier and hard-hitting effect than by trying to express this with words alone. It allows me to poke at things I feel are wrong or right about life and the universe in a, hopefully, more eye-catching and effective way.
An example of this would be my final major project that uses the alphabet to highlight all the issues (in my eyes) that our country faces.

Do you have any tips for young illustrators, trying to develop their craft and their style?

Practice, practice, practice. I have drawn obsessively every day since I was old enough to hold a pencil. I think there is an element of having a natural talent when it comes to drawing, but I think what’s more important is how hard you work and how much you want to make it. You will always have doubts about yourself and your work, but by realising what your weaknesses are you can develop your skills more.
You learn as much from your peers as you do from highly successful, professional illustrators. By looking at what others do better than you, and trying to reconcile that in your own work, you can strive to get your work to the best it can be.

I think the key to being a good illustrator is to never be satisfied. Friends and family laugh at me for being a ‘perfectionist’ and never being completely satisfied with my work, despite giving it my all. But that has allowed me to push myself further each time. There’s nothing better than looking back at earlier work and realising how much you have improved!

Finally, where do you hope to be in the next few years?

I am hoping to combine my two great passions in life: illustration and teaching. I hope to be able to maintain a steady job in education as well as taking on freelance commissions. Drawing is a massive part of my life and I hope to be doing it until the day I die!

If anyone is interesting at looking at a bigger collection of my work, I would be happy to send you an online PDF. My e-mail address is: jemmathorne01@yahoo.co.uk

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Well I hope you enjoyed that as much as I enjoyed talking to Jemma! Go ahead and email Jemma for any work enquiries, or just to learn more about her pieces.

Katie

Introducing.. Eleanor Cunningham

Eleanor Cunningham is a recent MA Fine Arts graduate of Chelsea College of Art and Design as well as a fine artist working with photography and mixed media based in London.

Eleanor’s work is based upon the application of traditional and new technologies in relation to photography. As a medium that is constantly ever-changing, especially with its digital technologies, Eleanor is interested in the future and outcome of photography as a medium and art form. Her work focuses predominantly on the physicality of photography – The loss of it, as a result of recent digital culture. In creating her work, she explores how the content of her imagery determines this loss of physicality, as well as new ways in which to present it beyond the physical print.

Eleanor explains that she does not have full control in her development processes, which leaves way for mistakes and error – But she further goes on to explain that, “this element is important, as it leaves traces within the image (such as dust marks and scratches) that brings it closer and seems more real to us – as we ourselves have imperfections.” The artist’s use of manipulation, as well – whether by heat, coloured dyes, changes in emulsion or medium – transports the viewer into an alternative universe, retracing and re-analyzing objects and places in ways that were otherwise unbeknownst to them.

There is definitely something utterly moving and captivating about this artist’s work, and I don’t doubt any successes that are there for her in the near future.

To find out more about Eleanor’s work, visit her website – www.cunningart.co.uk

– Killian

(All images courtesy of Eleanor Cunningham) 

Victoria Horkan

Victoria Horkan is a fine artist based in Leeds. Studying an MA in textiles at Huddersfield University allowed her to explore the usage of different mediums. Her creations combine a staggering attention to detail with vibrant and passionate colouring, producing eye-catching work that is impossible not to notice.

‘Victoria’s work offers a bold, vibrant and expressive milieu of forms and colours that falls somewhere between the realms of impressionism, abstraction and expressionism. Taking inspiration from the natural world, her paintings make reference to creatures from the sky and sea.’ – Victoria’s Statement.

There is a great deal of life and freedom to the work, with a somehow calming effect, without the restraint of artistic intensity. A youthful energy encourages to viewer to move, to engage with the enchanting visual story being told and discover more.

In ‘Fragments’ (Image 1) we see hundreds of shards of photographs, freely yet intricately layered over oil paints, creating a mesmerising assortment of visuals that stay in the mind. ‘Masterpiece’ is no doubt a word that is often used to describe artworks that perhaps do not reach the criteria, but in this case, Victoria Horkan’s work is an exemplary example of a masterpiece. It would be hard to argue with the impeccable level of talent that this artist has.

Exhibited in London, Leeds, Belfast and Edinburgh and with clients in America, Italy, Dubai and Abu Dhabi – Victoria Horkan, like a butterfly, is fluttering to the top of the fine art world.

Yasmina Vulgarity

Her name holds a heavy, dark and aggressive connotation; her canvases are large and demanding of your attention; taking this intensity of feeling and the extensity of her art form together, it’s clear that Yasmina Vulgarity is an artistic wonder in Sheffield.

The size of Yasmina’s pieces allows you to lose yourself in their fluidity and colour. But as you trace the image in its specific detail, from focus to focus, you can see the level craft and artistry in the work.

Yasmina cites her influences as being the enigmatic Tim Burton and the imaginative Heston Blumenthal; the characteristics attributed to her influences are reflected in her own work. On her page, her work is described as:

“Yasmina takes her passion for the dark, macabre, historical, tropical, natural and curious to create colourful drawings, paintings, collages and prints from a miscellany of materials, for your amusement and pleasure… Yasmina currently works from her theatrical studio space in Leeds, where she uses fabrics, paint, found objects and drawing to explore her love for colour, pattern and surface design on a grand scale. Inspired by natural curiosities, food and history, Yasmina creates nostalgic and intriguing images of the world we live in.”

Yasmina Art

Website