Beauty and Soul Brought to London: One to Watch: Kenzie May

Boston-born, yet Britain-bred, Kenzie May is one of London’s young talented musicians using her experiences in the city as both her backdrop and inspiration. With admirable amounts of experience under her belt, Kenzie’s beats are organic in that they flow freely,  consisting of tongue-in-cheek wordplay and fluid, honest lyrics.

With songs such as the raw, moving “Say Nothing” which is almost reminiscent of ballads of the early nineties, to the upcoming single “Hide & Seek”, her word play based on love, with the twist of childhood games, memories, and nursery rhymes are honest and right on point for the more literary, thinking crowd.

Moved by  art and creativity, the mesmerising Kenzie May is both beautiful and talented. Her writing style and composition are one of the most relevant pieces of work for someone so in touch with our generation. The rawness in her synthesized and digital sounds  break the mold from the forgettable radio releases we hear constantly.

Having collaborated with favourites and pros, such as Sub Focus in their tune “Falling Down” ad well as BeatauCue “Slow Down” and Bastille & F Stokes “Bad Blood”, Kenzie May is hard working and experimental with different techniques.

Writing in a flow which makes the surface of your skin chill, as well as your body to rock form side to side, is a rare talent which Kenzie May possesses, as each song is haunting in a way to lead to an afterthought and reflection – pop music for the thinking set, if you will.

 Kenzie’s single “Hide & Seek” produced by Jocke Åhlund of Teddybears, is set to have its video release by the end of the month, done by De La Muerte Films.

For some pop with honesty and edge, check out more on https://soundcloud.com/kenziemay or check out her most recent collaboration with FTSE, “Float” on Soundcloud.

http://soundcloud.com/ftse-1/float-ft-kenzie-may

 Images via: http://kenziemay.com

Follow Kenzie May on Tumblr and Twitter:

http://kenziemay.tumblr.com 

@kenziemayb

 

 

Dwyle Flonk Film

With a name as abstract as theirs, it comes as no surprise that the two man band behind ‘Dwyle Flonk Film’ embrace the weirdness on a personal, as well as professional, level. We caught up with Jack and Lysander to discuss their magical world.

The two met at Downside School in Somerset, where they bonded over many things, not least of which ‘being dark-haired’. Warp Films and Warp Records, as well as Ninja Tune artists, also figured in their friendship, and later became key players in the creative inspiration behind Dwyle Flonk. It really came about, Jack says, from ‘finding the darkest in humanity funny’. He explains that ‘Dwyle Flonking is an old English game where the aim is to hit a man with a beer soaked rag. DFF does that but with film, in some way’.

This celebration of the absurd is at the heart of the Dwyle Flonk ethos; each film plays upon the uncanny and the bizarre, all with a good added dose of humour. They largely work in shorts that ‘experiment with stereotypes through film, and the subversion of normal film tropes’, and are quick to point out that ‘there is a lightness of touch in our work, though what we deal with is dark’. The films are testament to this, and the rather glib sentiment that DF is ‘whimsical about death, decay, sexual perversion, and creepiness’ probably most straightforwardly sums them up.

Both have impressive and lengthy creative resumes; Jack has worked extensively in film and theatre in Cheltenham, Weston-Super-Mare, Bristol and Edinburgh, career pinnacles being ‘an explicit and violent version’ of Huis Clos by Jean-Paul Sartre, directing a sell-out revival of Jonathan Harvey’s ‘Beautiful Thing’, and acting for Warner Bros TV. He currently studies TV, Theatre and Film at the University of Bristol. Lysander began by staging a school producation of Jam by Chris Morris, a production that still haunts the vacuous halls of my own subconscious. His education is a mixed bag, having worked in photography, to running a pub, to the antiques trade; a CV with a ‘breadth of experience that helps inform a lot of our work’. The both have before worked with BBC Drama, and can be seen in a new adaptation of The Lady Vanishes which aired on 17 March 2013.

Their rise to dizzying heights has commenced, and there are many projects currently on the go at DF, including a collaborative work with photographers and composers on the theme of ‘the weird’; curating the South West’s newest short film festival – Jump Cut Film Festival, in collaboration with various other media groups, in May 2013; as well as several films, including Gin. Two Fingers. and a short film about the troubles of being a statue performer.

Currently based in Bristol, they can be contacted at dwyleflonk@gmail.com.

Info on Jump Cut Film Festival can be found here: www.jumpcutfestival.co.uk

Film: The Goodparent, entry into Virgin Media Shorts 2012.