Mimi Winsor

Mimi Winsor graduated from Chelsea after what was a marathon show of twice-daily performances of her piece ‘Squeeze, pinch, stretch, roll, dollop and extrude’. The work consisted of large welded-iron structures which made up a sort of playdough sausage factory. White-clad and hatted factory workers kneaded, slapped and heaved 1 tonne of dough through Mimi’s contraptions over the course of the show. It twirled, plopped and mashed through machines in an often hilarious manner before the workers rushed it to the ‘extruder’ where it was finally processed, forming long pink sausages.

It looks like hard work and results in an ambitious, sensory and playful performance-piece which, rather than being simply sculptural, actually churns out art itself! Sculptures/sausages were for sale per lb.- a tickling nod towards the tricky conventions of selling degree show work. This constant, haphazard growth ended in a sea of extruded dough, the workers struggling, everything pink and mushy.

After completing various exciting builds such as a gigantic sea anemone for the Discovery Channel HQ, Mimi’s degree show also won her a commission on the giant Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground at Chelsea. In similarly dramatic style, she is creating a prison complete with prisoners to function in the open square. The piece called ‘Grinding the Wind’ references the history of the site which used to house MiIlbank Prison and involves Mimi’s own ‘correctional labour device’, inspired by the victorian Treadwheel Fan. The prisoners will operate the contraption in performances that nod to not only the ideas of process in art but also often absurd and pointless labour.

Catch a performance outside Chelsea (next to Tate Britain) from Thursday 17th October to Sunday 3rd November with performances on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays at 11:30am and 2pm. Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground, Chelsea College of Art and Design, SW1P 4JU.

 

All images copyright Mimi Winsor, www.mimiwinsor.com

Celeste Morton

The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee was a standout weekend for everyone involved. Freelance photographer and Graphic Designer Celeste Morton captured the day strikingly with photographs that each depicted a character with a story to tell.

“I headed to Westminster bridge on the monumental day, overlooking the jubilee boat parade, I’m not a die hard royalist but I was fascinated to see the special amount of effort people had gone to to witness the Queen. The weather was grey but spirits were high, and everyone seemed excited. I snapped the boy on his father’s shoulders just as a helicopter passed above and he turned to look, with the flag almost unfurling from his head like a speech bubble.”

“Regarding the girl; there was a fenced off pen for the armed forces, and it struck me how young some of the cadets were. I was watching them more than the big screens with Her Majesty on it, they were extremely intriguing people. This girl was particularly good to photograph, as she kept on craning her neck to watch the screens and she looked very important in her little navy hat, like innocence and youth dressed as a grown up. Lovely embroidered lettering as well. Even I can’t deny the uniforms are sensational.”

Celeste combines her love of photography with her discipline of graphic design. Living in London, she is constantly observing ongoing events. More of her work can be seen here.