Amy Fletcher

We have always had a complex relationship with technology: the dictionary defines the term as the application of scientific knowledge for practical purposes, but technology in its most abstract form could simply be defined as an apparatus or thing that aids us – a functional tool or a way of being. In that sense, we could argue that we have been intertwined with technology since the dawn of man. Artist and filmmaker Amy Fletcher explores these intricate ideas as part of her ongoing practice at Chelsea College of Art and Design.

In her most recent work Let’s Play, Fletcher creates a playful, whimsical space that seems to invite the viewer to interact with the screen even though there’s no viable form of participation. Amy notes that her work “has a childish sensibility to it […] most recently I have been examining the subject of technology within my practice; looking at its constantly evolving presence within society and our innate desire for the next slickest gadget and gizmo.”

As in popular culture, art itself is increasingly enmeshed by and within technology. Using the film medium, a high-tech camera and stop-frame animation, the artist appears in her own work through the form of disembodied limbs: poppy music accompanies a set of magical hands that conjure and play with a set of objects set against a flat backdrop.

As an audience, we know that it is not “real” and that the objects on screen are not really changing from 2D to 3D from one frame to another. Rather than trying to hide its fabricated nature, however, the video actually tries to emphasise this quality through the loud camera clicks that accompany each shot.

There’s something clever in the film’s careful positioning and flickering frames that captures the eye: like a deft magician, Amy uses the stop-frame animation genre to create an illusion the viewer is willing to invest in – despite, and perhaps because, of its honest and effective duplicity.

Take a look at Amy Fletcher’s online behance portfolio to see more of her past, current and ongoing work.

Soo Eun Baik

Soo Eun Baik is a Korean artist living and working in both Seoul and London. She has received her BA and MA degrees in Fine Art from Chelsea College of Art and Design.

Soo Eun’s work focuses predominantly on the medium of painting – utilizing watercolour, gouache and acrylic paints to achieve her desired pieces. Following her MA course at Chelsea, Soo Eun decided to focus on and then later on stick to painting the landscape in watercolour – This stemming from her interest in the medium’s translucent, fluid consistency, relating back to her relationships between (what she refers to as) her inner and outer spaces. The landscape becomes a metaphor for integrating these inner and outer spaces in association with the finished painting’s material property.

Through an abstraction of her perspective, tone and colour, she releases a surrealistic, fantastical environment that appears if from a transient, dream world.

To see more of Soo Eun’s work, feel free to visit her website here – http://www.sooeunbaik.com/

 

– Killian

Tommy Ramsay

Tommy Ramsay is a recent graduate of Chelsea College of Art and Design, where he received his BA in Fine Art.

At first glance, Tommy Ramsay’s work appears way too abstract to be understood straight away. However, with the right context and enough concentration, it is easy for the viewer to become almost completely immersed into the artist’s paintings. Stemmed from the idea of re-contextualizing and re-figuring every day, common spaces, Ramsay deliberately looks to combine the every day with the unrecognizable – the ‘non-places’, as the artist refers to them. The artist re-addresses these ‘non-places’ within the every day, giving them some sort of value and merit, looking to find an interpretation to them that would otherwise have been unknown before. He looks for specific details in these spaces – Rubbish, wear and tear, human interference – Anything that can become re-contextualized and brought to life in his paintings. By painting these spaces in his abstract, surrealist style, Ramsay allows the audience to delve into a place where time is slowed down, experience evolves and the space becomes a new, unrecognizable experience – Breathing new life into the painting.

 

– Killian

 

 

Geraldine Peclard

Geraldine Peclard is a Swiss artist and textile designer currently living in London.

Having just recently graduating from Chelsea College of Art and Design with a BA in Textile Design, Geraldine was always drawn to vibrant prints and a creative, freely-working workflow. After beginning her degree, Geraldine became inspired by statement artists who challenged prejudices; that used social issues and taboos to create their work. She then ventured into new, intrinsic ways of expressing her passion for vibrancy, pattern and design through other mediums – Painting and illustration, for example.

Geraldine’s recent work concentrates more so on the subject of mental illness, which she claims allows her to work freely and gives her unlimited interpretations of how the structure of her work can be. Despite her gruling subjects, Geraldine finds ways of taking all of that emotion and creating beautiful imagery with them.

To view more of Geraldine’s work, visit her website, here –   http://geraldinestories.blogspot.co.uk/

 

– Killian