Jing Hu

I first came across Jing Hu’s work at the University of the Arts London’s Freshers Fair last year, when we shared various works with each other as fellow fine art students. I was immediately blown away by the illustrative style of her paintings, possessing at once a very distinctive Chinese quality yet also the influence of western antiquity.

Her colour palettes ranges from vibrant reds to monochromatic greys, but the vast majority of her work have subdued, introspective undertones. The stylised, sometimes hybrid characters stare solemnly back at the observer, haunting in their androgynous, anime beauty and poised in frozen inertia. They sit or lounge or stand in luxurious, traditional settings or strangely fantastical landscapes. Doe-like eyes seem to accuse the viewer of something – you’re not sure exactly what, but they seem to be trying to communicate a story to you.

With a stroke of her brush, Jing Hu weaves an unspoken narrative between the threads of her seductive characters as she “explores ideas around flux, migration, urban-life with aesthetic codes as markers of identity and aspirations.” Essentially, her work elevates the banality of modern life to the realm of urban mythology.

To follow Jing Hu’s journey and view more of her works in her eclectic portfolio (which also includes mixed media art), visit her website.

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About Joey Phinn

My name is Joey and I am a freelance writer, blogger and student currently studying BA Fine Art at Chelsea College of Art & Design in London. I write for GKBCInc and update my own blog, Princeling, with an assortment of art, photography and prose. When I am not writing I enjoy watching Studio Ghibli animations, reading Murakami and obsessing over the beauty of Chinese gourds. Between planning eventual world domination and eventually becoming a “real” artist, I scour the deep web for those shining nuggets of creative talent that shape the undercurrent of British culture today – and, hopefully, our tomorrow.

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