Graduate Textile Designers and their unique projects

Camilla Wordie and Emily Martin are two Textile Design graduates from Edinburgh College of Art with distinctive degree projects showing an interesting take on Textiles. Both graduates spent their final year producing personal projects which show an innovative approach to the norm of textile design.

Camilla Wordie‘s degree project blurs the boundary between food and textiles. She started with ‘Edible Textiles’ in which she transformed food into wearable surfaces by changing the form of the food and its common structure. Every week when I was in the studio Camilla would have a desk full of food – pasta, chocolate, noodles, oats- and would be experimenting with transforming its texture, composition or form into a surface unrecognisable from its ordinary state.

Her degree work took an unusual approach: ‘wearing rice is nice’ is a collection of rice inspired fabrics made from manipulating various types of rice to add textures to your dining experience, all with a subtleness to the design and white colour palette; ‘please add me to your dish’ (main image) encourages diners to add an ingredient to their dish making a physical interaction with the ingredients and your food including a herb flooring. The ingredients are manipulated food products cleverly done with a variety of textile processes playing with textures, scale and composition.

Camilla’s exhibition at Edinburgh College of Art’s degree show definitely drew attention for its individual concept, perfect branding and immaculate presentation. Have a look for yourself at Camilla’s website

Emily Martin‘s ‘Collective Recollections’ degree project aims to help those with dementia. Her collection of wall hangings for Edinburgh’s care homes are a talking point for the residents and visitors with scenes of Edinburgh referencing the 1950s encouraging viewers to reminisce the city and their past – they are great conversation starters! She worked with the ‘Oasis dementia cafe’ in Edinburgh, which supports those with dementia, to share her ideas, get some feedback and get creative! With Portobello Beach, Blackford Pond and Princes St Gardens as her chosen scenes Emily combined a wealth of textile processes – digital print, traditional screenprinting, hand embroidery – to produce large detailed wall hangings that are both visually and texturally stimulating – a key feature for those with dementia. Emily has used the wall hangings as starting points for craft and art activities with the ‘Oasis dementia cafe’ group. See her wall hangings in full detail on her website .

Both Camilla and Emily have had successful textile careers so far with various award nominations and wins! The future is definitely bright and innovative…

This entry was posted in Art and tagged , , , , by Philippa Hill. Bookmark the permalink.

About Philippa Hill

Hello! I’m Philippa and I am a recent graduate from Edinburgh College of Art where I studied Textile Design. Since graduating I’ve interned and started my own mini craft company ‘De La Rue’. I’m currently an Artist in Residence at ECA and I cannot wait to showcase emerging talent from the beautiful city of Edinburgh! I came across the Born in Britain platform when my fashion collaboration with fellow student Marie Leiknes was blogged about last year and I am extremely excited to be an ambassador! I believe that we can leave a lot from British heritage and love uncovering things about the past that can influence the present and future. I love discovering things off the beaten track, traveling and finding that something a bit different! I am so keen to discover emerging talent from Edinburgh and showcase their amazing work. I think that every creative should deserve at least their 15 minutes of fame and ‘Born in Britain’ is the perfect project for this.

Comments are closed.