What Wins Best 90s Music Genre?

The great 1990s are a collection of ten incredible years hallmarked in history by their contribution to fashion and music.

90s music was a burst of angst, energy, colour, dance, and soul that has never repeated itself in quite the same way. Here, we’ll let 90s music fight 90s music. From Britpop to Eurodance, find out which is worthy of a 2017 comeback.

‘Girl Power’ vs…

90s music was all about powerful and influential female groups and singers. Expressive songs, motivational videos and power ballads from bands like Eternal, Destiny’s Child, En Vogue, Whitney Houston, Mariah Carey, Britney Spears, and Christina ‘Xtina’ Aguilera were a hugely popular break from the male-dominated music scene of the time. Madonna was as omnipotent as ever and Sugababes managed to hop onto one of the last departing trains for the decade in 1998, but — of course — ‘Girl Power’ was high-kicked into a global phenomenon by the almighty Spice Girls.

An unforgettable quintet whose posters were plastered on the walls of every young girl’s bedroom during the decade, the five famously fabricated personalities of the Spice Girls gave young girls someone to identify with and pushed the idea that women could be successful independently from men (admittedly, their former manager, Simon Fuller, played a part).

Britpop

Britpop was, as you can guess, all about singing for British youths and acted almost as a counter attack on the themes of American songs at the time. Bands like Blur, Oasis, The Verve, and Manic Street Preachers took influence from 60s/70s British rock music and propelled Britpop to subculture status with its own distinct clothing and attitude. 90s songs like Wonderwall and Parklife had a strong sense of local identity and working class ethics that really spoke to youths of the day, while the behaviour and atmosphere of Britpop championed the brazen maleness of ‘lad culture’ at a time when ‘Girl Power’ was about to make waves.

Verdict:

While Girl Power instilled self-belief and confidence in many young girls, Britpop was all about giving the working-class a mainstream platform and voice. Feminism vs. social mobility? We’re backing off and making this one a tie.

Party dance routines vs…

From Whigfield’s Saturday Night to Los del Rio’s Macarena, you have to admit the 90s were a hit for disco routines. Not only were these ideal ways of moving from the corner to the dancefloor at the unavoidable school Christmas party, but they’ve also been helping DJs crank up the party spirit at wedding receptions and 18th birthdays ever since. In this time of dabbing, twerking and whipping your hair; there was something pricelessly innocent about doing Madonna’s Vogue gestures, followed by a Steps’ 5,6,7,8 and Rednex Cotton Eye Joe hoedown.

Boy bands

Although 90s music was big on girls groups, the stage was fairly shared by the boy band. N’Sync and Backstreet Boys were America’s greatest exports in this industry, while Take That and Westlife fought back well for the UK and Ireland. The ballads, bubblegum pop tunes and craze-making dance routines pumped out by boy bands of the 90s created the type of frenzy seen by Elvis fans in the 50s and The Beatles followers in the 60s.

Before we knew it, there were dolls, posters, magazines, and clothing devoted to these vocal harmony groups but unfortunately, this led many to associate boy bands as being mere puppets of a money-hungry record label. Although we tired of miming shows, structured interviews and tacky merchandise, many boy bands have actually made a respectable return to the music scene in the past few years, including Take That and Backstreet Boys. So, there was talent behind the trash after all.

Verdict:

Although these disco dance routines are always good fun, the boy band 90s music genre was a formidable force. Even today, we wonder if Smash Hits would have kept in print without it. All in all, it’s that wonderful sense of nostalgia that has persuaded us to let the boys win this one. Nothing brings back memories of our youth than the dolls, posters, concert t-shirts, and scrapbooks filled with ‘I *heart* Justin’ of our beloved 90s boys.

Feelgood party tunes vs…

The 1990s were a feelgood decade. Home Alone was on at the cinema, the World Wide Web had its first test run, Nokia’s Snake was controlling all our minds, and Harry Potter flew into our lives. But this was also the season of boppy, catchy pop songs that still get us dancing today. In the same year that Tony Blair rode Labour back into office the Danish-Norwegian pop group, Aqua, released Barbie Girl and we were hooked. The 90s music scene was peppered with unforgettable tunes like B*Witched’s C’est la Vie, Chumbawamba’s Tubthumping, Right Said Fred’s I’m Too Sexy, Ricky Martin’s Livin’ La Vida Loca, and literally anything Steps released. Yes, these weren’t lyrical masterpieces, but they were a good laugh and we all loved them back in the day.

Contemporary R’n’B and urban music

In the 1990s, the world was more connected than it’s ever been. So, let’s look at 90s music outside the UK. The greatest genre to captivate the decade was modern R’n’B/urban which was spearheaded by artists including: Faith Evans, Lauryn Hill, En Vogue, Boyz II Men, Usher, R. Kelly, and TLC.

Combining funk, pop and blues, contemporary R’n’B and urban songs are rich, soulful and emotional which was a great contrast between the more sugary ballads and techno tunes they were up against in the 90s. Tracks such as I Will Always Love You by Whitney Houston and Vision of Love by Mariah Carey kick-started the genre which has weaved its way through the following decades to nourish global stars like Beyonce, Ne-Yo and John Legend.

Verdict:

We’re grateful for the cool, deep and inspiring songs of 90s R’n’B music, and how they’ve contributed to our music then and today. But if we could bring either of these 90s music genres back; our heart says feelgood. There’s no better party starter or stress booster than a cheesy 90s playlist. Let’s face it, family occasions just wouldn’t be the same without a 90s feelgood megamix at the end of the night.

Hip Hop vs…

The world of 90s music would be incomplete without a nod to the globally-renowned rappers and hip-hop stars of the day. From 2Pac, Notorious B.I.G, and Vanilla Ice, to Ice Cube, Busta Rhymes and Eminem; hip hop was the genre of choice if you wanted an unfiltered insight into hard urban culture that’s often glossed over in mainstream media. Empowering, rhythmic and confident, hip-hop was the top-selling genre of music in the mid-to-late 1990s. Similar to Britpop, hip-hop is a subculture, generally containing key elements like rapping, graffiti, breakdancing, and DJing, which could explain its popularity across the world.

Eurodance

Rarely has technology and musicality collided so fruitfully. The birth of Eurodance masters like Vengaboys, Haddaway, 2 Unlimited, Corona, and Scatman John came about in the 90s due to the explosion of equipment that enabled electronic music. A combination of house, techno and dance, the Eurodance 90s music genre is recognisable for its use of synthesizers and strong bass rhythms. This type of music is almost always positive and upbeat with a strong undercurrent of partying and generally having a good time — ideal going out soundtrack for when you’re getting ready.

Verdict:

Although Eurodance has helped us get pumped up for crucial life moments, we can’t place it above the global phenomenon that is 90s hip-hop. The decade propelled the gritty genre all over the world and it’d be a very different stream of sound today if it weren’t for the rappers of the 90s.

Rock vs…

This decade was also the time that the great rock bands in modern musical history came to our attention. Before 1990, many rock bands had just a niche following compared to other genres, but as we entered the decade we saw bands like Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Red Hot Chilli Peppers, and The Smashing Pumpkins receive attention from major music labels and become commercially successful. The energetic performances and expressive song lyrics really filled a gap in 90s music, and the media presented rock’s popularity throughout the 1990s almost as a rebellion of real music and emotions against the more manufactured genres of the time.

Country

Country music rocketed in popularity and airtime during the beginning of the 1990s — it even had a cover story about its history and appeal in Time magazine. Aficionados will probably attribute a lot of 90s fame to the surge in people taking up line dancing. Even in the UK, many working men’s clubs had a weekly line dancing night and this helped songs like Achy Breaky Heart and Boot-Scootin Boogie ride high in the charts. As the decade progressed, artists like Shania Twain, LeAnn Rimes, Tim McGraw, Faith Hill, and Dixie Chicks took a hold of the genre and helped to usher it into the consciousness of a younger audience. Almost certainly, it was this nudge into the ‘poppier’ mainstream arena during the 1990s that helped breathe new life into country music and make sure it made it into 2017.

Verdict:

The problem is, both these genres are raw and creative, inspiring millions of fans for so many years. Country songs all seem to tell a true-to-life story, while rock expresses all the emotions we want to show for us. Dare we draw another tie?

The 90s were a huge decade for music. If you want to check out our range of retro shoes, browse our men’s and women’s Gola Classics for the perfect throwback trend to suit your style.

Summer 2017’s Hottest Shoe Trends

If you’re choosing your warm-weather wardrobe and need some footwear inspiration, check out our top shoes for summer 2017. We’ve looked at what’s tearing up the catwalks across the world right now to give you a clear-cut run-down of how to get ahead of the game this summer.

From sliders to snakeskin, our top picks for the best shoes in summer 2017 touch on a wide range of quirky designs that promise an interesting look this summer.

Wrap-around sandals

Top in our list of shoes for summer 2017 is the chic wraparound sandal, which are designed to be comfy, flat footwear — as sandals should be — but with a stylish twist. These sandals have extra material for winding around your ankle or even your lower leg to add some glamour to an otherwise ordinary shoe. This shows off your skin beautifully and it also adds to the security of your sandal which are notorious for flying off with the odd meaningful stride.

Platform and flatform shoes

Think Baby Spice in the Wannabe video and we need say no more. Platform shoes are dragging the legendary 1990s into today and will be a huge summer 2017 shoe trend. You’ll be able to get these in a range of colours, with open and closed toe options and materials, too.

Coming with the platform is the next generation of super-elevating shoes: the flatform. Set to join it’s cousin in taking summer 2017 by storm, the flatform shoe has the same sassy appeal — just a completely even base. Plat-and-flat-forms are real statement-makers, so they look great in bold colours with a neutral outfit. However, we’d also suggest you go for a type with an ankle-strap to make sure you don’t fall off them.

Kitten heel shoes

We never thought we’d see the day the divisive kitten heel would be in a ‘summer trend’ list, but here she is. Kitten heels — high-heels’ meeker and milder sister — are coming back with a bang this season. But, when you think about it, why not? They’re the ideal shoe to add a touch of height without becoming uncomfortable, plus they’re versatile enough to wear for both smart/casual and dressy events.

Wear them with sheer stockings of go barefoot and get a pair with an ankle strap for added support.

Kitten Heel Shoes

Re-visiting the 90s

The next 1990s-inspired theme to hit summer 2017 will be the 90s streetwear shoes. Those chunky trainers with big logos are going to be all the rage — especially for men. On top of that, the cool and casual sneaker is due to be a common footwear choice for boys this season, too. We think this type of laid back footwear looks great with slim-fit jeans or chinos and a checked shirt.

Gola Classics Men's Monaco Trainer

Spring boots

Boots might not be the first shoe to spring to mind for a warm weather outfit choice, but they will actually be a top trend for shoes in summer 2017. Thigh-high and ankle boots in all kinds of fabrics having been up and down the catwalks lately and there seems to be a focus on warm colours (perhaps to match the climate). So, choose your favourite material and get a pair of summer boots in orange or yellow to fit the trend.

Skinny stilettos

Incredibly thin stiletto heels are also set to be popular shoes for summer 2017. Flying in the face of the aforementioned chunky platform trend, the next season will also feature thinner-than-ever footwear options. If you’re a skilled high-heel walker, this is the shoe for you.

The skinny stiletto looks incredibly elegant and really makes you get the picture-perfect posture in order to stay steady. You’ll be able to get these in all kinds of materials and styles. Go for a peep-toe variety or try on a pair with lots of wraps and straps going above your ankle.

Stiletto Shoes

Emphasis on great outdoors

A major summer 2017 shoe trend is the great outdoors. Khaki shades, camouflage options, durable trainers, and bulky, lace-up boots are going to be smash hits for trend-setting men — particularly if they wear them with windcheater jackets and a backpack.

Gola Active Men's Glarus Trainer

Yellow season

Summer 2017 is going to be splattered with yellow. A huge next-season trend in shoes, this bright and sunny shade will be available across all kinds of footwear, from men’s canvas espadrilles to women’s ankle boots.

Black and white checks and off-white

If you’re not into fresh-out-the-box-looking white shoes and prefer something a bit less high maintenance, shoes in summer 2017 are going to be more off-white for your convenience. Less blinding and easier to keep looking good, off-white and cream plimsolls or trainers are great accessories to match with a block colour shirt and plain jeans.

Gola Classics Men's Coaster Off White

Doodled-on sneakers

If you do stick with white, why not add some flair to them with a pen? Drawing and writing on plain sneakers are going to be big in summer 2017, so get a pack of colours and make yours stand out.

Rounded heels

Rounded heels are the ultimate shoe. They give you elevation for longer-looking legs, yet don’t offer the same level of falling-risk as standard high heels. Round-heel shoes are in this summer, and we particularly like the ones featuring contrasting colours between the heel and main shoe to show off the design.

Sandals with socks and boots

Our shoes for summer 2017 list wouldn’t be complete without this beauty of a trend. Wearing socks, tights or stockings with your sandals is going to be a top fashion style, which goes completely against what we thought was good dress etiquette. If you like the look of a pair of sandals, but don’t want your feet on show, it’s a great solution and there’s obviously a huge range of varieties you can choose from to get a different look every time.

Shiny shoes

Gleaming sandals, heels and boots are set to be the finish-of-choice this summer, too. That polished look is a fantastic fit for classy nights out and we suppose it makes sense to get something shiny to catch the sun when the warm weather hits.

Lot of laces

Every top fashion designer is going to be on the lace trend next season. From multi-coloured laces that contrast the shoe they tie up, to dainty types that cover just the top of your foot. You can even buy new laces to go with a plain pair of sneakers and plimsolls to add some flair to your footwear.

Gola Classics Men's Breaker Plimsoll

Open back footwear/slingback shoes

Shoes for summer 2017 are going to heavily feature open-back footwear. Jetting off somewhere hot on holiday or even just enjoying the nice weather at home means that you’ll probably want a shoe that’s airy and breathable. This slingback trend — with just a single strip going around your heel — will come in a range of thin and thick straps to suit the feel you want. Plus, you’ll be able to choose from a good mix of casual and formal looks so you can get the right look for a particular event.

Varsity look

Summer 2017 shoes are going to benefit from a heavy dose of athletic inspiration. You’ll find lots of sneakers, plimsolls and retro trainers on the soles of people next season, which is perfect if you want a comfy day shoe that still looks like you put the effort in.

Gola Classics Women's Varsity Trainers

Snakeskin

Perhaps not everyone’s bag, but snakeskin has also made our grand ‘shoes for summer 2017’ run-down. Don’t just go for the typical snakeskin colour, though. The trend this year will see snakeskin in all kinds of bold and beautiful shades and you’ll find plenty of combo-fabric varieties if you don’t want your entire shoe in full serpent mode.

Moroccan slippers

If you like the coolness and breathability of sliders, but aren’t really into bright and bold designs, go for Moroccan slippers instead. Summer 2017 will bring a touch of the exotic thanks to an influx of this footwear type — also know as babouche slippers — which will mainly feature a subtle colour palette and simpler styles.

Sliders over flip-flops

Obviously, the flip-flop is a staple part of anyone’s summer. But this year, it might have some competition. Funky sliders in a rainbow of the brightest colours and embellished with sequins and flower patterns are set to strut the shops, promenades and beer garden terraces in summer 2017. Comfy and eye-catching, we’ve already seen great designs from fashion’s leading names, including Prada, Miu Miu and Dolce & Gabbana.

Flip Flops

For retro shoes that are perfect for summer 2017; check out our ranges of men’s Gola Classics and women’s Gola Classics before you head off.

How 80s and 90s Manchester Music Changed Male Fashion

Music and fashion is a stormy marriage. For one artist it’s a supportive crux that keeps them in the limelight (Madonna’s cones and anything Gaga), for others it’s the first sign that things are on the slide (Sinitta’s X-Factor palmleaf dress).

But the clothing choices we make owes a lot to bands and singers, and few areas can boast a heavyweight title in this area than the Manchester music scene.

This vibrant north-west England metropolis — the first city outside of London to open an Armani shop — is divided between delirious Madchester, rhythmic Northern Soul, and ballsy Britpop. A city that fuses ‘Manc Swag’ and all-night clubbing with high-end designer shops and ultra-chic hangouts; we’re looking at how Manchester music launched male fashion into unchartered territory.

Manchster music

Happy Mondays

If you hear Madchester, one of the first bands you see is Happy Mondays. The term Madchester became part of British vocabulary in the 1990s. It was created to sum up a revolution in Manchester’s music scene, as well as the surging popularity of psychedelic rock and electronic dance music. Madchester’s quirky/bohemian clothes and fresh sound worked together to create a cultural phenomenon in the city, which centred around the explosion in the availability of ecstasy that changed a ‘night out’ into an entirely new experience.

Before anyone knew it, ‘baggy music’ — a genre of funk, house, guitar rock, and psychedelic sounds — was born and Happy Mondays fandom soared.

Even excluding the band’s hallucinatory sound, mad performances and off-stage behaviour, Happy Mondays is one of the most entertaining bands ever to hit music fashion.

Think flared jeans, buttoned up shirts and hippie-like tops (or just Shaggy from Scooby Doo) topped off with a fishing or bucket hat and you’ve got a visual style that is Madchester through and through. Happy Mondays fans quickly followed suit and even today, we can buy the smiling ‘acid face’ logo emblazoned on t-shirts and hoodies, which shows how the band’s fashion legacy has kept strong.

Stone Roses

A lot like Happy Mondays, Stone Roses helped to marry music and fashion, and were massive players on the Manchester music scene. Founding member, Ian Brown, led the band to international stardom in the 1980s, and they soon become famous for their distinctive style and resurrection of flared trousers.

From the fisherman bucket hat to the Adidas jacket, Stone Roses fashion was all about loose clothes and a casual dress sense. You catch Stone Roses fans sporting tracksuit tops, floral or checked shirts, too-big Stone Island sweatshirts, and maybe even the iconic ‘mod cut’ hairdo made famous by Brown himself. This messy haircut is a mix of classic rock and ‘baggy style’, influencing stars and fans alike over many years — including Liam Gallagher and The Enemy.

Stone Roses helped to create a fashion spin-off of the ‘baggy music’ genre that fans loved, and this Manchester band became synonymous with the term, scally — a word first used to simply describe a working class person with a casual/sportswear dress sense that is now, unfortunately, almost always used as an insult for yobbish behaviour.

Oasis

Another of Manchester music’s most famous bands, Oasis, formed in 1991 and won countless MTV, NME and Brit awards before splitting in 2009.

Immediately when you think of how Oasis dressed, you probably imagine khaki parkas, baggy shirts and Lennon-esque glasses. A big part of music and fashion in Manchester around Oasis’ heyday was the revival of the 1960s’ Mod, which Oasis spearheaded amazingly.

Original mod fashion brought together tailored suits and military-style trench coats with buttoned-down collars and fitted trousers. Bands like Oasis took hold of this idea and spun it into something that fitted perfectly into the world of Manchester music. Keeping the streamlined look, Oasis gave mod fashion a rockier edge with Paisley-print shirts, tracksuit jackets, messy haircuts, khaki coats zipped up to the chin, and straight/slim fit jeans (never skinny).

Brands like Levi, Fred Perry and Tommy Hilfiger were often found draped on The Gallaghers, who also loved the lightweight, waist-length look of the Harrington jacket. This garment was actually first made in Manchester, which probably made it a source of pride for the Mancunians, and it was the perfect mix of smart/casual for the quintessential 90s’ mod look.

Throughout their time at the top, the Oasis boys loved the odd Kangol-branded bucket hat like the rest of Madchester, and made sure to sling on plenty of Adidas tracky jackets (fully-zipped) for the ultimate lad-look that you see everywhere today.

Oasis continues to influence the world of fashion. Ex-member, Liam Gallagher, started fashion label, Pretty Green, in 2009 which has had great success in bringing Oasis’ mod/Britpop/90s’ lad fashion into 2017.

Joy Division

A Manchester music scene titan, Joy Division was originally called Warsaw and formed in 1976. It had great commercial success before the death of lead singer, Ian Curtis; but was also a leader in alternative fashion that still influences fans today.

The band had a very simplistic attitude to clothing. Tucked-in dress shirts, plain suit trousers, brogues, and large overcoats with upturned collars was the style of Joy Division. Similar to The Smiths, Joy Division opted for monochrome shades that didn’t attract attention and helped encapsulate the dark, emotional, disenchanted sound that was Joy Division’s post punk/gothic rock legacy.

The Smiths

Eighties’ rock band, The Smiths, had huge influence over the independent music scene and inspired a wave of alternative rock/indie pop groups. But when questioned about fashion, Morrissey was brutally dismissive of clothing trends and claimed that The Smiths were pretty much the worst dressed band ever.

Many fans clearly disagreed and Morrissey is still known for his quiffed hairstyle and wire-rimmed glasses (which possibly inspired Liam Gallagher’s spectacles affinity). The Smiths’ uniform consisted of baggy shirts, over-sized cardis and large jumpers, but they also had a grungier side that was made up of acid-washed/ripped jeans, leather jackets and sunglasses. These styles worked to cement the band’s unique and unforgettable sound that blended poignant, multi-layered songs with an undertone of youth angst and discontent.

The Smiths came about at a time when the flamboyant costumes of Duran Duran, Adam Ant and Culture Club sashayed around the opposite side of the Eighties’ music stage. However hard Morrissey fought on the side of art against fashion pageantry, The Smiths still inspired generations of dressers who go for the thoughtless, laid-back, ‘thrown-on’ look every morning.

Manchester music and fashion has revolutionised British style for decades. Check out our range of retro men’s and women’s plimsolls for your own alternative look.

#WhichGolaAreYou – Olivia Purvis

Introducing our latest #WhichGolaAreYou blogger: London-based Olivia Purvis.

Olivia Purvis #WhichGolaAreYouOlivia’s style is the perfect blend of cool, classic and contemporary, and her blog — What Olivia Did — has become a go-to guide for beauty, fashion and lifestyle.

Inspired by Spotify, Pinterest and the style on the streets of London, Olivia’s look is fresh and relaxed with a feminine twist, making her an obvious choice for the campaign.

Gola Classics

Olivia rated Gola Classics as colourful, current and extremely practical — basically able to go with pretty much anything and comfortable enough to walk in for hours on end. More than that, she loved how these shoes look both classic and on trend at the same time, which gives them a retro appeal which is really ‘of the moment’.

Olivia’s chosen style was the Gola Classics Women’s Tennis Trainers. Integrating flawlessly with her personal look, she loves how classic they are, that she can style them with jeans or a dress, and that they perfectly complement her girly style. Gola Cllassics Women's Tennis TrainerOlivia Purvis Wearing Gola Classic Women's Tennis Trainers

If you want an everyday but super stylish outfit, Olivia suggests matching Gola Tennis Trainers with pale blue wash jeans, a white T-shirt and a bomber jacket. The perfect combo for that laidback, ‘just-thrown-on’ look.Olivia Sitting Wearing Gola Classics Women's Tennis Trainers

Gola Classics Women’s Specialist Trainers

Next up were our Gola Classics Women’s Specialist Trainers, a great option when you want to add a pop of colour to your look. Olivia chose Specialist in sky blue but you can get the style in loads of different colours, from gold to navy.

Gola Specialists Navy and Metallic Gold

Her top tip if you treat yourself to a pair of Gola Specialist Trainers is to wear them with something in a similar colour for a relaxed yet stylishly coordinated look.Olivia Purvis #WhichGolaAreYou

Olivia Purvis #WhichGolaAreYou

Check out our Instagram for more #WhichGolaAreYou bloggers or get involved yourself at #WhichGolaAreYou.

Sport: 50 Years in the Future

The realm of athletic stars, world-breaking records, international tournaments, and lifelong rivalries are part of all our lives in 2017. But have you ever considered the future of sports and what it’d be in 2067?

Sports is an unpredictable, ever-evolving phenomenon that whips up a multi-billion pound betting frenzy like nothing else. The future of sports is a maze of new and daring ways to pull the best out of its players and create the most intense experience for its fans. With the rapid rise of virtualization technology, ballooning authority of social media, and intensifying focus on user experience, find out what could be in store for sports in 50 years.

Sports in the Future

Future sports equipment

We predict that sports across the board will be obsessed with achieving unbelievable speeds, shots, throws, and goals. Exciting results get unavoidable shares, likes and retweets pinging across the world, which means more fans, more sponsorships and more advertising deals — all free of charge.

We can see every tactic possible being used to enhance the performances of sporting stars in a bid to boost the breaking of unbreakable records and create demi-God athletes that will make prime social media stalking targets to keep up momentum. Even today, sportswear brands are constantly re-inventing clothing to make it easier for athletes to out-perform themselves, and in the future, we reckon that everything from shot puts to football turf will be artificially enhanced for the ideal level of feel, speed, traction, and manoeuvrability.

Expect hi-tech track surfaces for sprinters, enhanced/low-drag costumes for swimmers, spring-loaded courts for basketball players, and ultra-streamlined everything to push the boundaries of human limitations. Running Track

Future stadiums

Where we view our sports will go through the greatest transformation in the next 50 years. In the next few decades, we can see super-stadiums for the biggest teams and events, decked out with virtual rides, hologram replays and personal video feeds you use to track your favourite player throughout the game.

But by 50 years, viewing sports will be dominated by the 3D, virtual stadium where you can zoom, tilt and pan using an optical head-mounted device (think Google Glass without the failure). Of course, there’ll still be fans in the stadium watching the game, your headset will simply let you tap in from home.

Why headsets? We predict a voracious focus on lucrative sponsorship deals instead of traditional ticket purchases, which is why a headset is ideal for hosting regular, unavoidable flashes of selected logos and adverts beamed across your eyes.

Gone will be the days of queueing at the turnstile, climbing to your seat and seeing a pie lobbed off a steward’s head. We’ll have virtual subscriptions to replace paper season tickets, surround sound for those atmospheric chants, and assigned (virtual) seats every time so we can sit with our friends without having to sit with our friends.

Virtual Reality Headset

Future match Format

Commercials and sponsorships are likely to exert even greater influence over the sports format in the future.

Endorsements are big money in every sport, which is why a growing amount of air-time is devoted to getting them seen and heard. In the UK, the value of all Premier League shirt sponsorship deals reached £226.5 million for the 2016-17 season, which might go someway to explain why football matches are already packed with extra commentary and statistics to lengthen the programme and squeeze in more advertising. Even in America, the NFL shows about 100 commercials for just 11 minutes of play, while getting a 30-second ad slot during Sunday Night Football would cost you approximately $625,000.

Future of American Football

Looking at these statistics, it’s not big a stretch to imagine a future where sports are tweaked for a more ad-friendly format. In 50 years, we can imagine sports with few sections of play (like football’s two-half structure) perhaps introducing extra water breaks or switching to a quarterly format in order to anchor in more promotional material.

We might even go one step further and annihilate the heart-racing penalty shoot-out in football, which we reckon will be substituted for lengthier matches that last as long as they have to — punctured with plenty of breaks.

The future sporting environment

In 50 years, we’ll either all be massively green or have destroyed ourselves. So, if we’re still around, the jet-setting world of sports is likely to be a popular target for promoting eco-friendliness.

To survive, NASCAR and Formula One motors will probably all be electric to save on carbon emissions, and we will see a rise in competitive cycling as part of a future worldwide bid to encourage less cars on the road.

Future of Cycling

In stadium sports, the introduction of virtual arenas will be heavily subsidised by many governments in order to reduce unrecyclable waste left behind by fans after games.

In this future of endorsements, celebrity status and respect for the eco-system, we can also see more cash incentives and a greater responsibility placed on sports personalities for showing the masses how they should be a good citizen. Expect plenty of viral content from leading athletes shared across the world to encourage their followers of the importance of being green.

Future of sports globalisation

The future of sports revolves around the global athlete. We think sports in 50 years will have transcended country borders and we’ll see everything from international Premier Leagues to worldwide NFLs. Instead of nationally segmenting our teams, we’ll judge them on an international scale, creating divisions peppered with teams and fans from every part of the globe, playing together on a regular basis (imagine Man City thrashing LA Galaxy in a mid-week game on your virtual headset).

Future Football Pitch

There’s currently talk of the NFL putting more resources into finding talented athletes on other continents — could American football take over as the first world-inclusive sport in 50 years’ time? And would this spell the end for international tournaments and national victories, like the Olympics and World Cup?

As we’ve probably said too many times, the future of sports is steered by money, and there’s only so much a business can grow domestically.

A fairer game in the future?

The last we heard, there have already been secret video technology trials carried out in Premier League matches this season. However, football is a curiously slow member of the sporting family when it comes to implementing this across the board.

Thankfully, the future of sports will likely be built around instant replay and video evidence used to support every sporting decision. So, no more uproar following embarrassing ref mistakes like Lampard’s disqualified goal and Maradona’s laughable Hand of God.

But why not go one step further? Sports in 50 years might kit out its rugby, cricket and football players with tiny cameras strapped to their boots or collars in order to capture every rant and dirty tackle for the ultimate in fair-play and entertainment.

Personally, we’re in two minds. On the one hand, we’re all about playing by the rules and ensuring a game is won justly. But hating the referee or umpire is such a unifying experience for fans that taking the decision-making out of their hands could just ruin the atmosphere.

Future Referee

On a less crucial point. The future of sports will likely leave behind the mandatory coin-toss at the beginning of many sporting events. Football matches still use it to decide who kicks-off, but we’re sure half a century will create an app that will provide an even more random result to the heads-or-tails scenario.

Future commentary and broadcasting

The future of sports is all about the viewer. Even now, events like Formula One races are strategically held at peak TV viewing times in Europe to ensure they pull in their maximum audience, and we’re seeing more and more kick-off times deviating from the 3pm time slot for a more TV-friendly time.

In 50 years, we can see every league and division having its own channel which means a sad farewell to scuffles between networks like the BBC and ITV for the broadcasting rights to Premier League matches.

Another big change will be the authority of social media, which will replace the traditional, sit-down press conference after a game and will introduce live, post-match Tweeting direct from players to fans.

Future personalities and sports extinctions

The big news about sports in 50 years is that snooker might not be there to see it. The gentleman’s game of snooker has lost many of the big names and famous personalities that made it popular during the 1980s, like Steve Davis and Dennis Taylor.

Greed for big-money deals means that any sport like snooker and darts without huge team sponsorships, heavily endorsed stars, and prime-time viewing slots are pushed aside to make extra room for more emotional games, animated players and photo-opportunistic moments that are prime meme fodder and offer the greatest money-making chances.

Future of Rugby

Virtual sports

As we’ve said before in our predictions, we’ll likely see more augmented reality and virtual reality interfaces in sports, with all decisions, formerly dictated by men with whistles, coming from computers.

The future of sports brings with it more meticulous analysis, aided by instant replay, video feedback and masses of statistics presented in seconds. Boxing and kickboxing, for example, will receive instantaneous information about key parts of the sport, such as impact and strength, which will be analysed by coaches and medics to dictate if a fight should end or how the boxer should end it.

Future of Kickboxing

Delving deeper into the world of virtualism, skipping 50 years into the world of sport might give us completely transformed games, like virtual driving in Formula One. Perhaps this could be a way of keeping alive the due-to-be-departed sports like snooker and darts, too.

Future kits

Sports gear of the future, will offer more for your money. Why have one sponsor when you can have several? Shirts to come will be made from a materials that enable multiple endorsement logos and ads to show throughout a game, which will go far to keep up with the demand.

Similar to the microscopic camera idea strapped to players’ kit, we imagine that integration and communication will be commonplace among players and management in 50 years. Team members will be fitted with earpieces so that the coach can speak directly to them at all times, rather than hollering from the sidelines, which should lead to a more tactical game for the viewer to enjoy.

Another key kit change we expect to see in sport in 50 years is one that we’re sure will happen much sooner. Many UK scientists today firmly believe that repeated headers during a professional footballer’s career can lead to long-term brain damage. So, we’re almost certain that the world of sport in 50 years will require each of its players to wear headguards on the pitch.

With the ever-growing focus on health and safety, sports in 50 years will likely strap its athletes up with respiratory and heart rate gauges during games to ensure that players are monitored throughout, rather than just once the game finishes.

Really off-the-wall ideas for sports in the future:

Here’s a selection of more world-changing sporting events that, for us looking at the prospect now, would change sports beyond modern-day recognition.

    Football dies out; the sport became too commercialised and was strewn with pampered players, so fans revolted and boycotted until it was no more.

    Health and Safety takes over; sports like American football and boxing diminish while ‘safer’ sports like basketball, croquet and badminton flourish in the cotton-wool future.

    Olympics is cancelled; mass globalisation and a political drive towards dishonouring national pride eradicates competition between countries and anything that promotes it.

    Human athletes are replaced with robots; sports become solely about the fandom, voyeurism and entertainment. Players’ talents and physical builds are replicated in machines, which are then continually enhanced for a sleeker, better performance.

Empty Racing Track

Check out our men’s Gola Classics and women’s Gola Classics before you go.

Famous Comeback Brands and Trends for 2017

Things happen for a reason. From sporting brands to fashion trends, our childhoods were filled with some incredible styles and entertainment that have shaped us into the sterling civilians we are today. So it’s no big shock that a selection of these are making a comeback this year.

We’re on the brink of a nostalgia invasion, where our childhood merges with our adult life to create new favourites from old memories.

Scroll down to find the biggest retro comeback trends set to light up 2017.

TV Returns

Just when you thought Netflix was life, it seems that our screens are going to explode with former TV favourites in 2017. Coming soon, you have Star Trek, Will and Grace, Twin Peaks, and That’s So Raven to look forward to, and we even read rumours that cinematic greats like My Best Friend’s Wedding and Cruel Intentions could return as TV/theatre spin-offs. But they’re TBC. Unfortunately, Will Smith has denied that The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air is coming back to us and therefore dashed our hopes and dreams.

Old TV Set

How well these resurrections will do is anyone’s guess, but other comeback shows like Gilmore Girls, Fuller House and even famous 90s’ trend The Powerpuff Girls have fared well since returning in 2016.

Comeback logo sweatshirts

A top 90s trend you’ll remember from your youth and now on their way back to our wardrobes: those jumpers with the massive brand logos across the front! Everyone had a favourite and they were ideal for playing out and lounging around in, which was just the dream back then. And now, probably.

Nothing if not a versatile fashion trend, you could even go for the ‘dressed-down look’ with a sporty, logo-emblazoned sweater. We think the nostalgia alone will make this comeback a huge hit.

Top knot (a.k.a ‘the bun’)

Popularised by the effortlessly elegant Audrey Hepburn in 1961 film Breakfast at Tiffany’s; piling your hair on top of your head is fast becoming the status quo of the hair world. So much so, that even men are getting in on it. Even though the man bun might be dividing opinions across the nation; the top knot — whether neat or messy — is a fashion revival warrior.

Trackies

What was life without your best, one-colour tracksuit? Collecting every colour from your favorite brand was a rite of passage back in the day. If the Nineties had a uniform, the matching tracksuit would be it.

The tracksuit trend started back in the 1960s, although it never really become fashion until the 1970s and didn’t smash it’s Personal Best until the late 80s/early 90s. Get ready for the rebirth of the rave-age, two-piece suit!

Sixties lashes

Another top fashion comeback hailing from the Swinging Sixties, the lashes on everyone from your average mod to fashion legend Twiggy were lacquered to the max during the 1960s. We know the false-lash effect has been around some time, but the fashion trend is only going to get bigger, thicker and blacker in 2017. So, get set for another great year of tossing your head back to open your eyes.

The return of the instant photo

Who could have missed the great comeback of the Polaroid camera? The instant square photo in your hand was simply the biggest of marvels when you were younger, and now you can get lots of different Polaroid camera designs to deliver that magic to the next generation.

In a digital world that hates the printed copy, we’re not surprised the Polaroid has achieved its comeback success.

Polaroid Camera

Shoe fashion revivals

Shoes make or break the outfit. So 2017 is due to give us a modern twist on old faithful styles. Beatle boots are going to build on the success they’ve had recently with more and more men opting for them to complement a smart/casual outfit. A type of Chelsea boot that’s famously tight-fitted and Cuban-heeled with a pointed toe, the Beatle boot was huge in the 1960s and is actually named after the Fab Four.

For lucky ladies, you can anticipate the resurgence of the tenaciously impenetrable jelly shoe. Back when you practiced Spice Girls dance routines in the street, jelly shoes were simply the only way to go, and this summer you’ll get to high-kick in them again. Expect platform and flat varieties with glitter and matte options in a rainbow of colours.

Brand fusion comebacks

What we’ve also noticed when we’ve been looking for comeback music, sports and fashion trends, is that some of these actually merge to create a sort of ‘super-comeback’. Look at LEGO, Marvel and Star Wars. The famous toy brick brand, nearly went bankrupt in the early 2000s soon after the iconic comic book franchise’s stock value plummeted, and who could forget the 2008-2015 gap between intergalactic films.

Now, goodness has been restored. We can get Star Wars themed LEGO so addictive it’s worth having a kid for, plus the promise of a Marvel/Star Wars miniseries crossover due to hit our shelves soon! Perhaps a helping hand is all any trend needs to comeback with a bang.

LEGO Heads

Sport trends to return

Getting back to clothing, classic sportswear is set to flood the fashion field this summer.

Many once-hot sports brands have teamed up with other labels to make their grand re-entrance. As a result, you get the ideal ‘2017-retro’ fashion blend with an excellent mix of modern and classic sportswear.

Some clothes will stay close to their original look, so you’ll get a lot of vintage gear to take you back to your youth. Then there’ll be others that have slightly departed from their energetic, or frenzied, designs for a more mature and sophisticated appearance perfectly suited to the adult world.

Jewellery rebirth

A true 90s trend, the choker necklace straddled the neck of every female A-lister a couple of decades ago. This accessory was practical and handy to wear with any outfit for any occasion. The velvet choker in particular brings back fond memories for us, but now you can get all kinds of materials and designs to find the ideal restrictive jewellery for you.

Music comebacks fresh for 2017

We all know about Craig David’s return and who didn’t see Kerry Katona at the Big Reunion concert; but 2017 is set to bring us a host of even more lyrical comebacks. Expect a Steps-Vengaboys hybrid touring the UK soon, alongside fresh songs from Pink, Gwen Stefani, Lauryn Hill, and Missy Elliott.

Concert

2017 lives for retro. Take a look through some of our men’s and women’s classic shoes to get in on the trend yourself.

Gola Interviews… Circa Waves

Since launching debut album ‘Young Chasers’ in 2015, Liverpudlian-born band, Circa Waves, has made an incredible impact on the music scene. From sell-out tours to performances at Glastonbury, the band has grown both lyrically and musically to become one of the most respected bands on the circuit.

Currently on a UK tour and enjoying massive success with newly-released second album ‘Different Creatures’, we caught up with Circa Waves’ guitarist, songwriter and lead singer, Kieran Shundall, to find out more about the roots, present and future of Circa Waves.

Circa Waves

There’s a significant change in sound between ‘Different Creatures’ and your first record ‘Young Chasers’. It’s a bit grittier and your lyrics are about darker themes, like alcoholism and depression. Was this shift a conscious decision with this record or was it something that came naturally from growing as part of Circa Waves?

KS: It was just what came out naturally when I started writing in early 2016. Our first record was more about looking back, but the lyrics in ‘Different Creatures’ are very present. It all came out of its own accord, really.



You worked with Alan Moulder on this album, who is the producer that worked with The Smashing Pumpkins and My Bloody Valentine. These bands have quite a distinctively raw, distorted sound. Did you seek him out because you wanted that sound, was it something he just created organically, or was it a bit of both?

KS: A bit of both, really. Alan has made every legendary rock record and the great thing is that he has all the knowledge. If you want that specific sound, he’s usually got the pedal that did that sound.

I think we asked one time: “How do you get the snare sound from that record?” and he just texted Butch Vig and got whatever snare it was, whatever mic was used, and within two hours had them both there ready to go. He’s got such a wealth of knowledge and information to get what you need. He’s also really patient and able to reach inside an artist’s brain and pull out the best, which is great for us because we don’t speak fluent musical language.

It seems like you knew exactly how you wanted each instrument to sound in every song. When you were writing, did you have a clear idea of how you wanted the album to turn out?

KS: Yeah. A lot of the demos did sound quite similar to the end result you heard. I’ve got a meticulous ‘demo-ing’ obsession. I think it’s a good foundation to have for an artist to go into the studio and say: “Let’s just make this but do it better”. Obviously, Alan is very gifted at doing that.

As much as you seem to have a specific idea in mind with ‘Different Creatures’, it sounds completely natural and doesn’t come across as over-polished. For example, I noticed you chose to keep in a comment you make about someone texting you at the end of one of the songs on the album…

KS: That was actually all orchestrated! We did loads of fake overdubs.

Really?! So did Alan try to get the right mics for how you wanted that to come across?

KS: Nah, in all seriousness, it’s something that we’ve all always loved. Like when you listen to old Beatles records and you can hear them all talking to each other. As a listener, it sucks you in straight away, which is what you want. For me, I always remember being able to hear when the Arctic Monkeys click the distortion pedal off at the end of their first record.

It’s immersive, isn’t it? It takes you right into the studio.

KS: Yeah, you’re in the studio with them. I’ve always wanted that. No matter how big the production — and it’s big on some of these songs — I still want it to feel personal to everyone listening to us.

Circa Waves

The album has been very successful so far. Do you feel you’ve now reached a place as a band, commercially or artistically, where you’re happy with where you are?

KS: No, I don’t think we’re content at all, really. We are really proud of what we have achieved and what we’ve done, but I don’t think we will ever think we have made it. Even when we’re headlining festivals, we’ll want to headline two festivals.

Any musician who is content should probably give up. You’ll stop making music that means something to you. We’ve got that drive and just want to keep moving up and up. We’re really happy with the album, but we want to keep pushing it as far as we can take it.

I think that takes a lot of confidence as a band. Is that how you feel?

KS: Yeah. I think when we first started we were just happy to actually be in a band. You get a record deal and take everything with a pinch of salt. You go: “Well, we’re just glad we’re here!”.

But over the last few years, we’ve seen the reactions that we’ve had and we’ve watched ourselves getting bigger and better. That alone makes you more confident. It’s hard not to be when you see 10,000 people singing your songs back to you! It’s such a massive boost. We want more of that.

It seems like Circa Waves is a band that has worked from the ground up. Do you think it’s harder, particularly as quite a working-class group, to take that path?

KS: I think we pride ourselves on being a live band that have toured continuously. Since we were all about 14 years old, we’ve been playing live and honing our craft, and we’re definitely happy to have made our name that way and not through some awful TV show.

We’ve played the toilet circuit (a network of small music venues that hosts rising rock, indie and metal bands) many times over to get to this point. Hopefully, people will see how we did it and it’ll inspire them to grow their own band that way and not look for the easy way into it. Unfortunately, there are a lot of people who think you just have to go on ‘The Voice’, or whatever, to make it.

But, is it hard to support yourself when you’re starting out and not seeing that kind of success?

KS: When we were first in bands, we all had jobs and would practice at night. With Circa Waves, we got signed really early which gives you a foundation of cash to live on. Not much, but enough to get by and just concentrate on being a band and making music. So, I don’t know, sometimes you’ve just got to put yourself out there and do it.

Circa Waves

You said you pride yourself on being a live band, as it’s where you built character and honed your craft. Is there any particular way you approach performing live? Is it an entirely different performance or do you go out and play with the same energy and enthusiasm that you did in the studio?

KS: I suppose it is a bit of a performance. I don’t walk around the way I do on stage in real life. You have to have a bit of swagger when you’re in front of people.

Yeah, I’m sure Nick Cave doesn’t walk around on stage the way he does in real life, either. You are playing a bit of a role, aren’t you?

KS: It is a bit of a role. I think we are very aware of our fans and they’ve all paid £15 to come and see us, so we owe them that amount of entertainment. We do put everything into it and at the end of each gig, we’re sweating and our hands are bleeding. I don’t know any other bands at the moment who are as active as us in our genre. We do absolutely give it everything.

Are there any other bands right now that inspire you?

KS: The Vryll Society. They’re really cool, sort of like early The Verve. I’ve always loved the singer, Mike Ellis. He’s such a confident guy and actually reminds me of a young Mick Jagger. He’s a brilliant songwriter, too, so I’m really intrigued to see what he does next. I also heard Zuzu on Huw Stephens recently, who’s really cool, and Clean Cut Kid are doing well at the moment, I think.

Do you put much thought into your fashion when you’re on stage? Is there an image you aspire to when you’re performing?

KS: Elvis. We all try to be Elvis… As a band, we try to put a bit of effort into our look but we don’t wear guy-liner. Yet.

So, when you talked about ambition, you meant glam rock?

KS: Yeah. Flares and guy-liner.

That could be the next stage for Circa Waves.

KS: That’s the next level.

Circa Waves are made up of bandmates Kieran Shudall, Sam Rourke, Colin Jones, and Joe Falconer. The boys are currently touring across the UK, supported by INHEAVEN and The Magic Gang, and their latest album is available to buy now.

#WhichGolaAreYou – La Penderie de Chloé

After recently joining forces for our #WhichGolaAreYou campaign, we are delighted to present to you the esteemed French blogger, Chloe of La Penderie de Chloé.

La Penderie de Chloé was first launched back in June 2010 by freelancer Chloé as a simple and humorous way to share everything that drives her day-to-day life with the rest of the online world: think looks, shopping, travels and running!

In her post, Bordeaux-based Chloé took a trip around Paris with the Gola team, showing us all the stunning, world famous scenery as well as talking to us about her favourite Gola trainers and why the brand holds a dear place in her heart. Aside from the amazing photographs, we also captured the day on video to show the world just how much fun Chloe is and how great she looks in her much-loved Gola Classics footwear.

Head over to La Penderie de Chloé to read all of the gossip Chloé has to share about our day (there’s also hundreds of other brilliant posts which we highly recommend you check out), or check out the beautiful photographs and video below.

Watch out for more bloggers joining us on the #WhichGolaAreYou campaign soon!

Get involved in the discussion online using #WhichGolaAreYou

Chloe Lifestyle 002

Chloe Lifestyle 003

Gola Classics Trainers Now Available at Topshop!

Topshop.svg

There’s now even more places to buy your favourite trainers thanks to a new partnership between Gola and Topshop!

Many of the most popular Gola Classics styles, including Equipe and Harrier can now be found in Topshop’s flagship Oxford Street store as well as on Topshop’s website.

As a brand with an illustrious British heritage, it is with great pride that we can announce this association with a store which has been an integral part of the British high street over the last four decades. Topshop has been key in helping to shape British fashion for generations and now the addition of Gola Classics footwear to their shelves will help to further spread the word of our home grown retro style.

If you are passing the Oxford Street Topshop store, pop in and take a look at their latest season and remember to tweet or Instagram us photos of their Gola range!

Twitter – @GolaClassics
Instagram – @GolaClassics

Shop Gola at Topshop

En Brogue: The Trainers Guide – Hannah Rochell

Fashion editor Hannah Rochell, author of the well respected blog En Brogue has recently written a book called The Trainers Guide. The book is a celebration of Hannah’s favourite trainer styles, which span from the humble plimsoll to far more glamorous incarnations. We’re delighted to say, Gola, features twice on the list.

Page 1

The first Gola Classics trainer to be featured is the iconic Harrier, originally launched by Gola in 1968 and still going strong today. Hannah explains how she loves the charmingly retro feel of this shoe and its authenticity.

Page 2

Second to be featured is Gola’s collaboration with Cath Kidson. Cath Kidson’s vintage designs and Gola’s heritage style made a perfect combination in 2015 with two great capsule collections.

Page 3

The trainers guide is a perfect coffee table asset for all sneaker enthusiasts.

Gola Ridgerunner ‘National Parks’ Pack

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It is hard to deny the sheer beauty of some of the landscapes which we are lucky to be blessed with here in Britain. In order to celebrate these national treasures we have developed the hiking-inspired ‘National Parks’ pack Gola Ridgerunner. Inspired by the great outdoors Ridgerunner is packed full of autumnal colours reminiscent of our stunning countryside.

Gola Ridgerunner ‘Yorkshire Dales’

gola york

The Yorkshire Dales is situated in an upland area of the Pennines in Northern England. This historic area is famous for its Three Peak treks which take on Ingleborough, Pen-y-Ghent and Whernside, with many people attempting and succeeding to tackle all three in one day. Our Yorkshire Dales Ridgerunner trainer is made up of dark, earthy tones including tan, brown and black. It is also available in both low and high-top silhouettes with each featuring a tweed-look inner and cleated hiking style sole.

Gola Ridgerunner ‘Cairngorms’

gola cairn

The Cairngorms is a national park in the eastern Highlands of Scotland which is home to a mountain of the same name. The area is well known for its Caledonian pine forests and some of the best cycling trails available on our shores. The Cairngorm Ridgerunner is inspired by this beautiful location and features brown and tan set upon a background of navy blue with a red and tartan inner and cleated hiking style sole for extra grip.

Gola Classics: Pretty in Pink

No matter what time of year it is, a splash of pink will always brighten up your day. You could say it is lucky then that right now on the Gola website, we have dozens of brilliant pink ladies’ shoes and bags which can help add some much needed colour to these cold and grey winter months.

There are plenty of pretty pinks to be found in several of our Harrier trainers, which were originally launched in 1968 and are part of our Gola Classics collection. Whether it is bright pinks against a dark navy suede like these, or dark, warm pink with a navy wingflash like these, you can always count on pink to bring your Harriers to life.

Our next selection is an eclectic mix made up of three styles which are part of our Gola Classics range. These include black slip-ons with an elegant pink floral print, the 70s tennis classic Orchid in a bright shade of fuschia and last but not least the Gola x Liberty Art Fabrics Samurai which makes great use of one of Liberty’s intricate prints.

Finally, we bring you a trio of bright and bold Gola Classics Redford messenger bags. We have chosen a baby blue and pale pink design, an allover pink and fuchsia number and lastly a darker blue, pink and white take on our classic over-the-shoulder bag.

Don’t just take our word for it though, there are plenty more for you to browse and buy in the Gola online store!