About Katie House

Hi I’m Katie, and I’m a final year Advertising student at Huddersfield University. I’m a huge lover of all things Design related, but I’m also passionate about music and literature. I love getting out there, getting stuck in and seeing what more I can learn in the world of creativity and music. I’m a very passionate and dedicated person, with a love of communication design. When I’m not blogging for Gola or at University, I intern for a brand design agency, as well as write my own personal blog and often work freelance. I’m always up for a challenge and excited to try anything new. I was involved with the 2012 Born in Britain Gola campaign, so I’m thrilled to be back working with the team for 2013. I’m excited to get started and to see what talent I can uncover. Its been a great experience, and the blog has featured some amazing people, so who knows what 2013 will bring.

Ashley Dwyer

This week I was lucky enough to be introduced to a fantastic young talent in the graphic design industry. Ashley Dwyer is a recent graduate from the Winchester School of Art, where she has worked hard to develop her unique style. Its common today to see many young designers following the same trends and styles in their work, but what I love about Ashley, is that her work is new, fresh and full of character. She has been able to create a diverse portfolio, showing how her eye for detail can be translated across a wide range of media. For such enthusiasm and talent, its only a matter of time before we see much more from Ashley, and I for one am excited to watch her work progress even further. I caught up with her to ask a few questions:

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How would you describe your work and your style?

My style of work is very adaptive. Over my 3 years at university I have learnt to let the brief influence my style. It means I can discover new skills during a project that I may not have thought to do if I just stuck to one particular style.

As a designer your style seems very flexible to different briefs. Do you have a favourite medium to work with? 

My absolute favourite style is digital painting, to create the comic book style and if I can add the high fashion photography element in there I will, to make a piece of work I usually layer up many different mediums to get the best effect.

Do you have any advice for young designers, trying to establish their style?

My advice would be to not worry about having a distinctive style too early on, because as time passes you will mould yourself into a unique designer. I’m still not entirely sure what my style is! Also, employers love the idea of being able to sculpt a young artist if they don’t have a particular style.

Where do you hope to be in the future?

I would absolutely love being part of the graphic novel and gaming industry, whether it be on their design team or just making cups of coffee, as long as I am involved in some way!

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If you want to see more of Ashley, then check out her online portfolio here! 

Have a great week guys, Katie

Fung Yee Wai

Fung Yee is a recent graduate of Huddersfield University, with a bold passion and flair for Graphic design and paper craft. Her latest pieces are beautiful, intricate paper sculptures that will leave you in awe. Her work is not only clean and crisp, but also well thought out. She is able to communicate strong messages and concepts through her pieces, making them real show stoppers. With a string of awards already under her belt, this young designer is set to hit the ground running and take the design world by storm. I am totally in love with her pieces and I’m sure you will be too. Here’s what she had to say when I caught up with her recently:

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Tell me a little bit about yourself and your work

I am a british born chinese girl with a love for paper-craft. This love started off as a general hobby during my high school days, making some origami cranes. It wasn’t until my final year at University that I took this hobby further and developed it into a refined skill.

Your work has such a clear and distinctive style. Has it been difficult developing this, since you are still a young designer?

Yes, it has been rather difficult discovering this skill and style but with the support and encouragement from my tutor, Mr Brent Hardy-Smith, I managed to really challenge myself and create something new.

What were the inspirations for your latest pieces?

My latest white models are each based on a real event around the world, so you have the Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta, Montreal Jazz Festival, Day of the Dead, Cannes International Film Festival, Oktoberfest and Gion Matsuri (a Japanese summer festival).

Your work is always new, fresh and experimental. What can we expect to see from your next pieces?Will you be trying anything new in the future, or just perfecting your craft?

Haha, good question Katie, it will be a bit of both really. I would like to take on and learn new areas of design to build on my design skills but simultaneously, I would also like to continue crafting. It’s a difficult question to answer but we will see how things go!

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If you want to see more of fung yee’s work then visit her behance portfolio to see more of her stunning designs, and to also get in touch!

Behance: www.behance.net/fungyee

September Sky

This week I caught up with a fantastic young band, who have been working hard to develop their unique style. Hertfordshire based September Sky are an extremely talented group with both songwriting talent and awesome performance ability. With a string of upcoming shows the band are becoming more well known, with their talents continuing to develop. Definitely one to watch! Their music is deep, memorable and very catchy. I highly recommend you check them out, and definitely make it to one of their gigs if your in the hertfordshire, london area! With all great bands you haven’t fully experienced them, until you’ve seen them live. I caught up with the guys to ask them a few questions:

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Tell me a bit about your musical style as a band

Our style is one we like to say we found on our own. It is based around a pop punk/Alternative style with some post hardcore mixed in.

What influences and inspires you most, when creating your music?

I think we all have different influences, but that’s where our sound comes from. By each of us having our own we create something new. Mostly alternative bands like Paramore and Fightstar to Interpol, Coheed and Cambria, Evanescence and many others.

As a group, have you found if difficult to establish your style, or has it just come naturally?

We feel it came quite naturally, we enjoy what we play and we all seem to write music in a very similar style to each other so there’s not really much of a struggle to fit each other into one style, especially considering the diversity of music we listen to. Sometimes difficulties can come along for us when writing but once the ball gets rolling things come a lot easier.

What are your thoughts on the british music scene of today?

Different. Very different! It’s funny to see just how much music changes over the years and we think that if you go looking for them, there are hundreds of fantastic bands around, no matter what style or genre you prefer. We’ve played with such a huge range of bands and most nights we’ve found something we’ve really enjoyed and gotten into. There is so much creativity around where as, probably due to restrictions on freedom, some big signed bands can be lacking in something sometimes, but all n all the British scene is good

Finally where can our readers see more of you guys in the future? Do you have any up and coming shows or projects?

You can check out our Facebook page and our twitter

A few of our songs can be found on youtube and on our band page. 

And we have a video in the works so keep an eye out for us

The gigs we got coming up are 
20th July Bridgehouse, London
19th October Asylum Chelmsford
We hope to see you all there 

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I hope you enjoyed that guys! Be sure to check out the band online to be the first to hear about new songs and upcoming shows!

Twitter

Facebook

Youtube

 

Steph Carr

Steph Carr is a contemporary fine artist, who has just finished her degree at Sheffield Hallam University. Her work is both wonderfully conceptual and thought provoking, whilst still being beautifully executed. Her latest work is intricate and visually stunning, adding depth to the ideas behind each piece. In a time where contemporary artists are common, it’s rare to fine one with so much thought behind each piece, whilst still maintaining quality and visual effect. This is something that makes Steph special, and I urge you to see more of her. Here’s what she had to say:

Tell me about yourself as an artist

I’ve just graduated from BA Hons Contemporary Fine Art at Sheffield Hallam University. I work with everyday domestic materials, commonly found and used in the home currently to create objects that change themselves from waste material to objects of desire that you want to return to the home. I have a fascination for that transformation stage, the moment something changes from rubbish to some form of spectacle, offering a new way of looking. Being hands on is really important for me, in everything I do I aim for the materials to remain honest and for there to be signs of the objects being handmade. Taking inspiration from the in between moments in our everyday lives, materials show themselves be it a pile of used teabags or discarded material the textures and colours found in these objects is what I take away to make something new. My work has a deep routed focus on perception of beauty and I aim to create things that we actively want in our homes and lives.

What are the influences and inspirations behind your latest works?

My latest work seen in my degree show ‘The Discarded Made Tangible (Sweepings)’ was a creation of wallpaper. We drink hundreds of cups of tea within the home each month and the overriding waste was impossible to ignore. I began collecting the used teabags and in the drying out process placed them onto paper, the pattern and colour left on the paper by the bag was so beautiful I took this and created a wallpaper design. After a battle trying to reproduce the pattern by hand on the paper it became clear a digital aid was needed so I used a combination of Photoshop help to create the design and hands on approach by screen-printing the design by hand on to lining paper. For the purpose of the degree show it was important for me to offer clues to the viewer as to what materials had been used, so I matched the pigments as closely as possible to a tea staining. There are many references that flood into this work; the main points are the amount we use and waste in our homes and also the possibilities of those waste materials. I feel that the use of tea offers many links dependant on the viewer; some have referenced the similarities to Victorian wallpapers and the importance of the tea trade in that period, some have noticed similarities to the Rorschach inkblot test that uses pareidolia (seeing things in abstract inkblot images) in an attempt to gain insight into a person’s mental state. For me, I want the viewer to feel they want to remove the piece from the gallery space and return it to the home, where the material was collected and used.

As a young artist, have you found it difficult to establish your own style?

I think for any artist the pressure to find ‘a style’ is always the black sheep in the room. For me, going through the motions of university has been the best way to find out what I am interested in and how I want to progress with my work. It seems to have come from nowhere really, but when you think about the amount of information you soak up being surrounded by other artists in the form of tutors, outside professionals and peers it all contributes to your way of working and thinking. In my final year something seemed to change, a focusing of ideas (maybe the pressure of the degree show contributed!) and putting a piece of work in to the gallery space as your final university piece spurs you on to push yourself. There are some amazing opportunities for creative in this country and I find inspiration in all media’s and areas, the main thing I would say to any young artist is to just keep going! Wherever you go and whatever you see you take something with you and all of these aspects come together to form your ‘style’. I am still learning and growing as I think every artist does and with every piece I make there is more that I would like to do to it and new ideas that arise from putting a realised work in to a space.

What are your thoughts on the British Art scene of today?

Some of my greatest inspirations have been from British artists; I find the work of artists like Deborah Bowness (www.deborahbowness.com) so beautiful and they push me in my own mind and practice to keep going with an idea and to keep perfecting it. Bowness takes everyday objects such as lamps or chairs and uses photographs of them to create wallpaper, this can completely transform a space and offers solutions for those with little space in the home. She has also got a very interesting project on the go ‘The Paper Trail’ that takes disused spaces on our streets and papers them, drawing attention not only to her work but to the tragedy of our British high street where shops are closing down every day and spaces are being wasted. There are so many inspirational artists around and they keep emerging as more and more creative arise from schools, universities and colleges. Another huge inspiration for me is Timorous Beasties, their mainly hand-printed wallpapers and designs are so grand and beautiful, they are well known for their contemporary take on the traditional ‘Toile De Jouy’ pattern of Napoleonic France however they recreate scenes in a similar style of modern cities.

What can we expect to see from you in future?

I’m not too sure what the future holds! I am interested in many mediums including illustration photography and craft so I hope to always be involved in something creative. In an ideal world I would love to continue working on designs for wallpapers, fabrics and other aspects of the home however I am not sure how this would be possible currently! I will always be a creative person and in one way or another I know this passion will filter through to all aspects of my life. If nothing else, I just hope to offer some form of inspiration to those who see my work. In a society where we have no focus on what we use or waste, as it is so readily available to us, I hope to elevate the potential of what is in front of us to a position of significance.

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To find out more about this young artist and her work, contact her via her email:  carr_stephanie91@live.co.uk

 

Rory Green

This week I had the pleasure of getting to know a fantastic young artist from Essex. I’m a big Art fan myself, and I think it’s so interesting seeing what the young British art scene of today has to offer. As an artist, Rory is incredibly passionate and dedicated to his art. His pieces are deep, meaningful, yet still beautifully intriguing and visually effective. Drawing from both classic influences, and modern topics, Rory creates relatable works that speak to the audience. I find it’s rare in young artists to find someone that is not only talented, but knowledgable on what’s going on in the world of art today. Because of this Rory is someone who will continue to develop his work, bringing us more and more. One to watch, and a true British original. Here’s what he had to say:

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Tell me about yourself as an artist

I’m Rory I’m 21 and I do art at the University Of Hertfordshire. I’ve just finished my second year and I’ve probably gone the most long winded way about doing a Fine Art Degree. From leaving sixth form I did a foundation diploma at ware college, a foundation degree at war college and NOW, as most people I was at Ware with are leaving university I’m about to enter my third year at University Of Hertfordshire. My art work usually centres around myself and my reactions, thoughts and observations on what is around me from pop culture to my personal family life. I’ve been told that I’m a concept artist and I’d largely agree with that. My work takes all manor of forms from painting and photography to installation often trying to mix them all in some way to create my work.

What are the influences and inspirations behind your latest works?

Football. Football is the inspiration behind my current work because its what I’m surrounded by constantly. I’m football fan and however that is not the reason why I’ve chosen football as the subject of my latest body of work. My brother is a professional footballer so I see a different side of the beautiful game to that of the ninety minutes you see at a weekend. My work is challenging the public perception of football and footballers both culturally and whether they have a place in fine art. It’s an ongoing theme at the moment because I feel it’s something I can really sink my teeth into and enjoy creating work about. My most recent body of work shows photographs of myself dressed in my brothers football kits, England kits and Manchester United kits, a painting of myself showing a sort of tribute to a Peter Blake painting, a green canvas with football boots on it, a painting of myself holding a football and a football, on a plinth with the words “god is dead, football is your new religion” upon it. My aim for my work is to get a reaction out of my audience and get people to really think about what the hell I’m conveying. I like to keep it autonomous and allow the public to have their own opinion-I won’t force the meaning upon them.

Football unifies people the world over and I feel that art does that too. There are many similarities between the two for me. Grass roots football is no different to an art student at school, college or university and the galleries you show your work in is the same to the leagues in professional football with the big names and big buyers being the premiership.

As a young artist, have you found it difficult to establish your own style?

I think it’s hard for any young artist to find their own style whilst they are at university. You’re constantly being told to research and go to galleries to see what’s new, current, and modern in contemporary art and I think there is only so much information that you should and can take from what you’re seeing otherwise your instincts will be to work in a way which you know the outcome will be successful because it looks like what you saw last week in London. I’ve been guilty of that myself in the past and now coming to the end of my second year, I’ve found that I’m beginning to finally develop my own style. I was never one that wanted to do LOADS of research to inform my work however now I’ve found it’s about being selective with what you’re researching and selective with how you use it to inform your work…then your style will develop from what you yourself add to your research.

What are your thoughts on the British Art scene of today?

The British art scene today is ever growing under a pile of YBA comparison. Which isn’t as bad as it may sound. Yes the YBA’s were and still are the top draw in this countries top art galleries but they haven’t been young for twenty years. Yet what they did paved the way for art students like me to make the work I want to make. I think the British art scene is in a predicament of wanting to move away from the past and look to the future but the mainstream exposure for the future isn’t there. I’m a BIG fan of Sarah Maple right now. She’s going to be and SHOULD be our next biggest export however lazy comparisons of her being the heir to Tracey Emin’s thrown can hold her back instead of skyrocketing her, she’s brilliant. It’s a predicament because staging MASSIVE retrospectives generate LOADS of money and create a massive buzz about British art…but we should be making a fuss about the new young British artists that are making the noise now.

What can we expect to see from you in the future?

In the future I am going to finish my degree and possibly go on to do an MA…I’m more likely to do the MA and gather as much experience as I possibly can for when I finally leave. I have conflicting thoughts about wanting to teach or be a tutor with people that want to do art or just try it and go for it and be an artist. My work will keep growing as I do too, as corny as that sounds, but I’m going to keep on developing this body of work. One of the things I’ve learnt is that an artists artwork has to be a continuous line of enquiry rather than looking at it as “I’ve done one thing this semester and now I’m going to switch and look at some ing completely different” it has to flow and it has to be real. The best in anything whether its art, music, film…anything has to be real for it to be the best.

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Rory’s unique style and infectious passion for his art make him definitely one to watch in the future. I hope you enjoyed that as much as I did. To see more of Rory then get in touch:

Email: green.rory@hotmail.co.uk

Katie

Neverstar

Recently I had the pleasure of getting to know a fantastic new band, Neverstar. The incredible rock/metal band from Hertfordshire have hit the ground running, and have been churning out one awesome song after another. With a strong style they have developed over time, the band offer something different to the british music scene of today. The band themselves are all incredibly talented individuals, something that is rare in bands today. This of course helps them to create songs that are both well written, and performed, but also refreshing to listen to. I urge you to give them a try. Here’s what they had to say:

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Tell me a bit about your musical style as a band

We play a mixture of modern rock and symphonic metal. Musically we like to experiment and come up with something a little different.

What influences and inspires you most, when creating your music?

It can really be anything from a guitar riff, something on the news or even personal experiences.

As a group, have you found if difficult to establish your style, or has it just come naturally?

In the beginning we played around with various things, and it did take some time to find what feels authentically Neverstar. It definitely took some work to get to where we are today.

What are your thoughts on the British music scene of today?

It’s an exciting time, as there’s so many interesting new bands using influences from all kinds of genres. 

Do you have any advice for young musicians?

Perfect your craft, give it everything you’ve got and don’t give up.

Finally where can our readers see more of you guys in the future? Do you have any up and coming shows or projects?

We are working on new songs as we always do, and hope to get a second album out in a year or so. Gig wise, we’ll be playing in Southampton on 14 July and in Welwyn Garden City on 30 August.

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If you want to see more of Neverstar, or want to find out when you can see then live, then head over to their website now, they won’t disappoint you!

Website

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Twitter

Ria May Heighington

After being a fan for Ria May Heighington’s work for a while, I finally had the pleasure of chatting to her in depth about her designs, as well as seeing her latest collection. As always her work is stunning, enchanting, with so much life. The vintage style Ria favours is one she has worked with and developed over the years, but she is not someone who is afraid of pushing boundries or her self. Her work is not only vintage, but modern, with an identity of it’s own. With so many young fashion designers out there, it’s difficult for each to develop their own unique style, but Ria has done this almost effortlessly. The beauty and depth of her pieces have so much character, they almost seem to tell a story. It’s all these things that make me a big fan of her work, and because of this I’m delighted to introduce you to her today. Here’s what she had to say…

Can you tell me a little bit about you and your work?

I’m a fashion design student graduating from Cambridge School of Art. I love the forties and fifties, bows, lipstick, dolls and Disney princess!  My interests of Vintage and childhood memories bring feminine pieces with a creepy and humorous twist to my collections.

By researching and adoring print designs from the 1950’s known as conversational prints, this is where my ideas formed and for this collection and my previous collection I collected random vintage items from charity shops, vintage fairs and markets and scanned them straight to the computer and presented them in a story like way, this time dolls from around the world were used.

What are your biggest inspirations as a designer?

As a designer my inspirations come from girly and cute styles from the 1950’s, the innocence and dreamlike fairytales from Disney Princesses and the creepy context of Alice in Wonderland and also the use of dolls for the outstanding exhibition by Viktor & Rolf that I adored at the Barbican art gallery many years ago.

You have a very strong visual identity, do you have any advice for young designers looking to develop and establish their own style?

Advice I would give to young designers trying to establish and develop their own style, would be to try every aspect they can; if it be print, embroidery, womenswear, menswear, childrenswear etc and once you have the aspect you prefer then bring everything you love into that and experiment as you might surprise yourself!

Finally what can we expect to see from you next?

After graduating I hope to set up my own label named Little Dot and hopefully collaborate with other up and coming designers.

In the future I would love to have my own boutique shop whilst working on many other collections which is very exciting!

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To see more of her beautiful pieces, visit her page on the Cambridge School of Art website.

All the best

Katie

Poppy Cole

Poppy Cole is a young illustrator with a beautiful style that will have you falling in love with her work at first sight. Her fabulous use of collage creates a whimsical character and depth to all of her work. Fresh out of Norwich University of Arts, Poppy is  one talent you’ll soon be seeing much more of. Here’s what she had to say:

Could you tell me a little bit about you and your work?

I’ve been studying illustration in Norwich for the last three years and I’ve been drawing ever since I can remember. My work is collaged using paper and other materials that I obsessively collect and gather from wherever I happen to find it. Collaging is at the back of my mind constantly – I can’t walk past a leaflet without wondering whether it might make good collage material. I tend to sketch an image out first and then collage on top of the drawing – the sketching is just as enjoyable for me and means I can collage on top of observational/location drawings. It’s intricate and delicate work (and I get through a lot of glue) but there’s nothing quite like finding the perfect textured paper for an image.
My illustrations are often influenced by my surroundings. I love drawing on location and Norwich has been a beautiful city to study art in, so much of my recent work has focused on capturing that beauty and encouraging others to see it too.

What inspires you as an illustrator?

Other illustrators! There are so many amazing artists working at the moment that it is impossible not to be inspired by them. Some of my favourites are Andrew Bannecker, Helen Hallows, Jon Klassen and Tom Gauld but the list really is endless.

I am also inspired by my environment, as I mentioned above, and I find that simply going for a walk in a direction I haven’t been before or visiting a town I’ve never seen can inspire me in unlikely ways. Illustrators unfortunately have to spend a lot of their time at the same desk in the same room and this can be really stifling so I find it really helps to take breaks and try working in different places.

Golas campaign is called born in Britain. What do you think about the British art and design scene today?

I think actually it’s really great and we’re very lucky. We have such a fantastic array of galleries in Britain and with exhibitions like Images 36 that showcase amazing British illustration in beautiful venues like Somerset House, the art and design scene is really flourishing.

Some amazing illustrators have come out of Britain in recent years (Rob Ryan, Gemma Correll, Tom Gauld) and there are a lot of fantastic art schools in Britain producing new and exciting talent every single year. It’s really helping the art scene to develop into something we can be really proud of. And I think it is apparent that we are proud of it too, with the amount of creative-based businesses that are popping up in London, Norwich and other areas of the country. People are finding new ways to work creatively now – in the current economic climate, artists and designers are creating new and innovative jobs for themselves.

Do you have any advice for young illustrators who are just starting out and are trying to develop their own style?

It’s actually a really difficult thing to do and it was something I struggled with for a long time. I think it’s important whether you are at art school or not to take some time to experiment with absolutely everything and whether you love it, hate it, can’t do it or think it’s a waste of time, at least you can say you’ve tried it.
Ultimately, for me, it came down to realising what felt like the most natural way of working. I’ve never found illustration an easy thing to do – except when I collage. It felt natural and it made successful work and those were the two main things for me.

My advice would be to be patient, to get feedback as often as you can and to look at other artists and techniques for inspiration.

Finally, where might you be in a few years time?

In a few years time I hope to be hunched over my desk, still gluing tiny pieces of paper to slightly larger pieces of paper. I hope I will always be an illustrator.

To see more of Poppy and her beautiful illustrations then head over to her website, or why not tweet her? I’m sure you’ll love her work as much as  I do.

Website: www.poppycole.co.uk

Twitter: @poppyccole

Faye Galloway

Faye Galloway is a young and highly talented fashion designer, currently studying at Winchester School of Art, Southampton University. With her graduation just around the corner it won’t be long before her beautiful style of design is unleashed upon the world. Her work is so playful and expressive, allowing her to convey a strong androgynous style with light hints of femininity. This gives her work a rich depth that appeals to a vibrant and modern woman. But her style is by no means limited. With interests for colour and print, Faye’s work has developed over time to become versatile and flexible, whilst still maintaining her trademark aesthetic.

Faye’s broad interests both inside and outside of fashion have allowed her work to grow and adapt over time. She is also a talented illustrator, which allows her to convey her designs in beautiful and intricate illustrations.

Here’s what she had to say:

Can you tell me a little bit about your work and your style as a designer?

I specialise in fashion design but my work is very print orientated. I have a love for illustration and am forever drawing. I am drawn to colour and simplicity and this is always a starting point to starting a new project.

What has influenced your latest pieces?

I am currently working on my final major project and my main influences were collage, women and power. I recently visited the kurt schwitter exhibition, held at tate britain and felt instantly inspired by his work and the story portrayed about his immigration through the war. The silhouettes in my design process have been driven by androgyny and boyish looks with flirty hints of femininity. Reoccurring research within my project is imagery of mick and bianca jagger.

As well as being a talented designer, you also create beautiful illustrations of your pieces, will you ever branch out into over avenues of creativity besides fashion design?

I am a keen fashion illustrator so illustration is definitely an option I won’t cross out. Prior to my degree my work was very much about printed textiles, it is a path i still wish to pursue and am looking into studying at a higher level.

Where might we see you in the next few years?

After my degree I will be looking to apply for jobs in all of my interests whether is it fashion illustration, design or print for fashion.

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If you love Faye and her work as much as I do then feel free to get in touch with her to find out more about her work:

Email: fayegalloway@hotmail.com

Well I hope you all enjoyed that. Until next time…

Katie

Jemma Thorne

This week I had the pleasure of chatting to an amazing illustrator from Hertfordshire; Jemma Thorne. She has such a unique style that conveys so much raw personality and depth that I’ve been hooked from the first encounter. Her impeccable skill when it comes to drawing and line art, allow her to communicate her visions effortlessly, allowing her pieces to capture the imagination of the audience. She has developed her work over the years to combine beautifully detailed illustrations, with bold block colours. This has created an edginess in her pieces that is so infectious, with her sense of humour always shining through. Her work is both unique yet timeless, with something for everyone. I implore you to spend some time enjoying her work as I have been. Here’s what she had to say:

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Can you tell me a little bit about your style and your work?

My style of work involves detailed, and often laborious, line work that I then scan into my computer and colour on Photoshop. This approach works for me because my work is best suited with a flat, limited colour palette to show off the strong, clean line work. I find myself drawing most things, but I particularly enjoy drawing items of clothing and interesting objects. My work can be quite satirical at times, commenting on the many issues of the world, but I also enjoy working on a purely aesthetic level, helping me to develop my illustration style.

The Gola campaign is called “Born in Britain” are there any british artists or illustrators that inspire you?

An illustrator that inspires me for his genius humour and opinions that he puts forward in his illustrations, is the very talented Peter Brookes.
In terms of style, I adore the work of a lesser known illustrator called Jonathan Williams. Situated in Scotland, he has produced some great works for clients such as Virgin and The Times. I came across his work recently while researching for a project. His style is beautiful, clean and his use of colour is exquisite.

Your work is so visually effective, but it is also funny and expressive. Do you feel you are able to express yourself and your personality through your work?

I feel I am able to express my many opinions through my artwork and that it can often have a much punchier and hard-hitting effect than by trying to express this with words alone. It allows me to poke at things I feel are wrong or right about life and the universe in a, hopefully, more eye-catching and effective way.
An example of this would be my final major project that uses the alphabet to highlight all the issues (in my eyes) that our country faces.

Do you have any tips for young illustrators, trying to develop their craft and their style?

Practice, practice, practice. I have drawn obsessively every day since I was old enough to hold a pencil. I think there is an element of having a natural talent when it comes to drawing, but I think what’s more important is how hard you work and how much you want to make it. You will always have doubts about yourself and your work, but by realising what your weaknesses are you can develop your skills more.
You learn as much from your peers as you do from highly successful, professional illustrators. By looking at what others do better than you, and trying to reconcile that in your own work, you can strive to get your work to the best it can be.

I think the key to being a good illustrator is to never be satisfied. Friends and family laugh at me for being a ‘perfectionist’ and never being completely satisfied with my work, despite giving it my all. But that has allowed me to push myself further each time. There’s nothing better than looking back at earlier work and realising how much you have improved!

Finally, where do you hope to be in the next few years?

I am hoping to combine my two great passions in life: illustration and teaching. I hope to be able to maintain a steady job in education as well as taking on freelance commissions. Drawing is a massive part of my life and I hope to be doing it until the day I die!

If anyone is interesting at looking at a bigger collection of my work, I would be happy to send you an online PDF. My e-mail address is: jemmathorne01@yahoo.co.uk

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Well I hope you enjoyed that as much as I enjoyed talking to Jemma! Go ahead and email Jemma for any work enquiries, or just to learn more about her pieces.

Katie

Nick Riley

This week I’ve been chatting to a refreshing graphic designer with a bold style that mixes clean commercial design with show stopping conceptual pieces. Nick Riley, a soon to be graduate from Winchester School of Art, Southampton University is definitely one to watch in the world of design. His work is inventive and creative, never settling for the common place in design. This has helped him create an impressive online portfolio that shows how diverse and effective his work can be. However, interestingly, despite being a diverse and adaptable designer, he never misses the mark when it comes to the subject matter. There’s a charming realness to all of his pieces, that get a clear message across, whilst still being effortlessly beautiful. Just what you’d want from a talented designer. Here’s what he had to say…

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How would you describe your work and your style?

My work has a strong emphasis on colour with quite a minimalist approach to type. I also favour illustration over photography on the majority of my projects, perhaps due to it having a more harmonious relationship with bright colour schemes. I’d hope that my work appeals to quite a large audience and age range due to the colour schemes and simplicity of type layout. The majority of my work is print based and I’m a firm believer in the value and promotion of print over digital alternatives.

Your work is often very bold and graphic, what influences your style?

Michael Craig-Martin has been a large influence on my style for a good few years now, other artists such as William Morris have also played a part in some of my projects. Graphic designers such as David Carson and Stefan Sagmeister often influence how I approach briefs and the values I keep in mind when designing.

You’ve created some very deep and meaningful pieces ( like your genius loci work, which can be found on your online portfolio for those interested) do you prefer working in this style, or in a more commercial style?

The genius loci brief was really interesting due to the subject matter, seeing how the public dealt with the homeless brought about a lot of questions and it was good to explore those. However the more light-hearted, exciting briefs are what I prefer doing, I have more of an enthusiasm about brighter, positive challenges.

Where do you hope to be in the future?

I hope to head into London once I’ve graduated, as a junior graphic designer. I’d like to be mainly print based however the world is becoming evermore digital so I also look forward to designing for digital formats and briefs. Print and digital lends itself well to graphic installations and this is something I’d really like to get involved with.

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I hope you enjoyed that, and to really get a good idea of Nick’s work, I urge you to visit his website, and check him out for yourself!

Click here for Nick’s website

Marie Hague

Marie Hague is a graphic artist with a bold typographic style, currently studying at Winchester School of Art, Southampton University. With so many young typographists and graphic designers out there today, I find her style refreshing and hard hitting. Her work gets back to the basics of typographic art, whilst still challenging the norms, and showing the world something different. Her work combines beautiful and flawless layouts with intriguing character, that almost seems to say what everyones thinking. It’s this expressive style that has seen Marie’s work featured in a number of university exhibitions, and it won’t be the last we see of her by any means. Marie takes a functional layout and turns into something so conceptual and graphic, combined with beautiful typography, that she has created an experimental range of work that is bold, fresh and so real. I’m sure you’ll like her as much as I do:

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How would you describe your work and your style?

My work is mostly typographic, as I have a keen interest in typography and what you can create with just words. A lot of my work also looks at layout, and how the experimentation of these two things can say different things about your work to different people. I think experimentation with layout and typography can create simple, but visually effective pieces. A lot of my inspiration comes from magazines, as I am very interested in editorial design. I like looking at the different page layouts and typographical solutions used. I also like how different paper stocks/ printing processes used in different magazines can also say something about the piece.

Your work seems very expressive. Do you feel you are able to express yourself with your designs?

I think that when you are given briefs that aren’t as strict as others, its hard not to express yourself and your opinion through your work. I feel I can express myself through my work, whether its an opinion I have or whether its a particular style that reflects me. Off course when you are set a brief that is has stricter guidelines, then your work becomes less expressive, as it is less about you and more about your client.

Where do you hope to be in the future?

I would like to go into editorial design/ work with layout when I graduate, as I feel this is not only my strength but a part of design that interests me a lot. In a few years time I hope to gain more knowledge and experience in design, as I am always keen to learn new things. I hope to see myself perhaps working for a publication and creating new and exciting layouts for them.

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To see more from marie then visit her website here.

All the best, Katie

Posted in Art